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Po/ume 77 - 1989-199C 

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1000 Spring garden St. 
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"The campus is a very beautiful 
place. A lot of good things have 
been done of late to amplify and 
draw out its best features. More can 
be done but I am encouraged." 
- Chancellor William Moran 




3 



Students came 
to UNCG 





to stimulate and nurture their thoughts, 





to cultivate 
their minds, 



"College and the people I have 
met here have encouraged me to 
examine my values, and question 
why I believe them." 

- Rachel Wofford, Freshman 



5 



Some came 
with good ideas 
of what they 
wanted and 
discovered 
something 
better... 



"I expected to go into college as a 
kid and come out as an adult - but it 
hasn't been a magic transformation, 
I'm still the same, just more aware 
of things." 

- Dylan Lee, Junior 





...something different and unexpected. 




Students 

came with 

ripe ambitions 





These are the 
formative years 
of action, where 
students lose 
conventional 
roles and step 
forward to 
grasp what 
action they can, 
action toward 
enlightenment 
and change. 





The stimulus 
is in the 
nation, in the 
environment, 
and in the 
coming 
together of 
humanity. 




12 




It is in the 
breaking 
down of 
barriers and in 
the building of 
strongholds. 




13 



The stimulus 
is in our 
college lives 
as well. 



This is a yearbook about little things. It is a book devoted to 
noticing the everyday aspects of campus; the events, the activities, 
the socializing that happens everyday, and yet is so much a part of 
our lives, so ingrained into our routines, that we forget their beauty, 
their importance. Years from now, they will lose their clarity, they 
will become only soft-focused memories, perhaps fleeting reminis- 
cences. This yearbook is devoted to taking those memories that 
make up the intricate pattern of student life, and formulating these 
impressions into the Pine Needles. 




Ml things 








"I think that the overall college 
experience is an education that 
extends way beyond the classroom. 
While I have been at UNCG I've 
learned to live on a budget, how to 
manage my time, how to live with 
other people, and how to work my 
way around administrative red tape. 
I feel that all of these things will 
help me be successful in whatever I 
decide to do with my life. 

- Christi Gill, Senior 



16 




"One day during the first week 
after I arrived, a group of us just got 
together and went to the beach. We 
watched the sun rise, then we turned 
around and came back. It was very 
spur of the moment. We called 
ourselves the 'marrow suckers', you 
know, like in Dead Poet's Society. 
Robin Williams said to suck the 
marrow out of life. That's what we 
were doing." 

- Troy Canady, Freshman 




18 



The 



Mclver Statue 



Our 

Founder 

Everyone who attends UNCG 
know Charles Mclver. They see him 
every day, as they walk down College 
Avenue. Not many people have actually 
stopped to read the plaque underneath the 
statue. Who is this bronzed man'.' Why a 
statue and a building erected in his honor? 
Did he once donate a huge sum of money 
to the school? 

You might say he was important: 
he founded the University. Ninety-nine 
years ago. he went before the state legis- 
lature in order to establish an act that 
would support the education of women. 
In 1892, the institution became a reality, 
and was chartered the State Normal and 
Industrial School, then became the State 
Normal and Industrial College. Charles 
Mclver served as president until his death 
in 1406. 

In 1 893, the follow ing w as printed 
m the Greensboro Record: H\ his broad 
scholarship, sound judgement, remark- 
able energy and perserence, President 
\lcl\ er has achieved marked success, 
and litis dune mure for the cause of edu- 
cation than any other man in the state. 

And what great honor is be- 
stowed upon our most respected of 
founders? He is an object of expression. 
Dnc student said that when her mother at- 
tended UNCG, there was no Rock and so 
the statue was painted. Today he gets to 
wear toilet paper, newspapers. T-shirts, 
underwear, sporting equipment, pump- 
kins, and anything else students have the 
im igination ami gall to put on him. 

20 




The 



Rock 



Before the Move.. 







In It's New Location... 




A Piece 
of Tradition 

Twenty years ago. there was no 
Rock. Instead, our revered statue of 
Charles Mclver was subject to desecrea- 
tion by paint and costumes every day. 
Alpha Phi Omega, the first fraternity to 
be admitted to UNCG, stepped in to save 
the statue. They provided the Rock to the 
student body and started a colloquial tra- 
dition at UNCG. Though it does not have 
Charlie's good looks, students are still 
drawn to the Rock, sitting on it. centering 
activities around it. 

Recently, because of construc- 
tion, the Rock was moved to the side of 
the cafeteria. However, it still performs 
the same function. Even to this day. if 
you look at the Rock, you will find it 
adorned with brightly painted color, ad- 
vertising a message. 



"I think it's the most original and 
interesting method of advertising on 
campus. It's not only fun for the students, 
but also for those who paint it." 

-J. Andrew Ross, Sophmore 



21 




22 




The Jackson Library as we know 
it was completed in 1974 with the addi- 
tion of the 10-story tower (including base- 
ment). It took 50 people three 16 hour 
days to move UNCG's 500.000 hooks 
from the main building into the tower. 
Extraordinarily, the library was open for 
use during the move. Now UNCG has 
700, 000 books that comprise only a por- 
tion of its 1 .9 million holdings. 

How do you locate one resource 
in this abundance of material? Until this 
year, it was necessary to thumb through 
the enormous card catalog. Now you 
may simply ask JACLIN. No, she's not 
the new librarian; she's a computer sys- 
tem. Due to JACLIN, the library will 
discard 9 million cards from the card 
catalog. The remaining cards will be a 
shelf listing organized in the Library of 
Congress manner. 




23 



ELLIOTT 



UNIVERSITY 



CENTER 



Elliott University Center, centrally 
located on campus was built for you-the 
student. It is here to make your day and 
life run smoother. Need a break from the 
caf breakfast? Pop into the Soda Shop for 
some friendly service and good food. 

Discover you're low on school 
supplies? The Student Bookstore has just 
what you need. 

As long as your here, why not 
stop by the Sw eet Shoppe and buy a snack 
for that extra burst of energy to get you 
through class. 

For a quiet change of pace, enjoy 
a quiet, sit-down lunch in the Dogwood 
Room and then if you have a spare hour, 
you can catch up on the soaps or MTV 
videos or, if your more scholarly, find a 
quiet lounge and study. 

Do you need something to do, too 
much time on your hands? There's always 



the game room with pool tables and video 
games. But if you'd like to spend that 
time aquiring valuable work experience 
you might explore the third floor. You'll 
find-media. The Pine Needles, the 
Kaleidescope Video Yearbook, the Caro- 
linian, the Coraddi and EUC Graphics all 
call EUC home. They are always in need 
of writers, artists and business people. 

North Carolina Student Legislature. 
Residence Hall Association. Disabled 
Students' Association and other clubs 
and organizations have offices in EUC. 
Most club meetings and many social 
activities like dances, movies and mixers 
are held in EUC. So. if you need some 
excitement or just something a little dif- 
ferent, EUC may be just what you're 
looking for. 




A\K£ 

CHOSS 



24 




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The 



CAFE 



teria 



L 



J 



L. 



"It is one of the most productive 
departments that provides service 
for the students; we serve approxi- 
mately 1 1 ,000 meals a day and we 
serve this many people with clean- 
liness." 

- William Scott, 
on working in the dishroom 



!6 



In 1885. according to Bricks ami 
People UNCG's ( then Women's Col- 
lege of North Carolina ) cafeteria con- 
sisted of a group of student workers 
managed by Henderson Ferbault. and the 
food bill did not exceed eight dollars a 
month. Today the cafeteria is a source of 
employment for 360 people and is oper- 
ated by ARA food services. 

The cafeteria offers students a variety 
of food choices. On the lower level ice- 
cream, pizza, bakery and deli goods can 
be purchased. The upper level houses the 
more traditional "all-you-can- eat" style 
caf as well as Spencers and Leghorns. 
Bon appetit! 

This year the cafeteria saw yet another 
addition - a post office complete with a 
mailbox for each student. Now you can 
catch up on your mail while you eat. 






"All I can say is that the cafe- 
teria at UNCG is a step up from 
the one at my high school." 

- Rachel Wofford, Freshman 




GO 
C/3 



a 



C/5 

o 

5-H 



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u 



28 



Condom Vending Machines 



One of the most interesting and 
talked-ahout issues on campus this year 
was the drive to get condom vending ma- 
chines placed in the dorms and around 
campus. The drive was conducted by 
UNCG"s delegation to the North Caro- 
lina Student Legislature (NCSL), lead by 
Delegate Chairperson Chuck Taft. 

NCSL began the year by circulat- 
ing a petition in favor of condom vending 
machines that was signed by over 1700 
students. They then distributed a survey 
on condom vending machines that 307 
students responded to. of which 88.9 
percent were in favor of the machines. 

Their next move was to submit a 



"So unless you want all of your 
friends to start dying or getting 
diseases you have to make a few 
concessions. One of these conces- 
sions is to lighten up a little bit and 
give Chuck the condoms." 
- Chris McBrayer, Sophomore 



proposal in favor of the machines to 
Student Government ( SG I. expecting SG 
to pass it as a resolution. This was a 
mistake on their part. Despite the over- 
whelming support of students, and the 
support of SG President Adrienne Cregar 
and Vice-President Dawn Cannon. SG 
argued over the proposal for hours with- 
out ever acting on it. Some SG delegates 
claimed that the machines would pro- 
mote sexual activity on campus, while 
others charged that the proposal was racist 
because some of the factual information 
supporting the proposal was gathered from 
predominantly black campuses. The 
Carolinian, which favored the proposal, 
condemned SG for being immature and 
tailing to represent the student body. 
NCSL finally decided to submit their 
proposal to the administration on then 
own. 



Other groups have shown sup- 
port for condom vending machines as 
well. One student-faculty committee, 
the Health Promotion Committee, is 
expected to submit a proposal favoring 
the installation of the machines in 
dorms to the Academic cabinet some- 
time this spring. Although the admini- 
stration has so far been silent on the 
issue, it seems likely that the machines 
will eventually be installed. 



"UNCG was the first in the 
UNC system to distribute birth 
control devices through their 
health center. It seems to me that 
despite the overwhelming sup- 
port of the student body . the 
university is reluctant to be pro- 
gressive in this area. It would be 
a responsible decision for the 
university to make. It allows 
males to participate more actively 
in the process of birth control. 
Even though sexual education is 
the ultimate solution to sexual ir- 
responsibility, condom vending 
machines are an immediate solu- 
tion." 

-Chuck Taft, Junior 




"Racism will end. if it ever 
does, when we as a local, state, 
and national community stop 
pretending it doesn't exist and 
deal with it." 

- Michael Robinson, 
Graduate Student 



A visitor to UNCG will notice 
that part of the beauty of the school comes 
from the diversity of the campus. From 
the Bryan School of Business and Econ- 
monics to the Julius Foust Building, the 
uniqueness of UNCG comes from differ- 
ent styles working together to form one 
cohesive campus. 

In the same vein, the diversity of 
our student body serves only to enrich the 
campus. Our student body contains many 
different colors and nationalities. A visi- 
tor to UNCG would probably think that 
the different styles and ways of thinking 
serve to form one close-knit community. 
As students we know that that is often not 
the case. 

It has been said that UNCG is 
sitting on a powder keg of racial tensions. 
Accusations of racism and discrimina- 
tion fly from every corner. Black stu- 
dents accuse white students of racism. 
White students attempt to walk the fence 
of alliances while others openly perpetu- 



ate stereotypes ami antagonize other stu- 
dents. 

There is a self-segregation at 
UNCG between whites and blacks. For 
example, there are two greek systems, a 
while one and a black one. White greeks 
complain that their invitations to the black 
fraternities and sororities go unreceived. 
Black greeks complain that they are not 
welcome in the white greek community, 
and therefore want nothing to do with it. 
Both systems are governed by one group, 
but they remain separate. 

Until black and white students 
work together to form a single commu- 
nity, there will be two UNCGs. We will 
all he losing out on one of life's most 
valuable lessons — a person's worth does 
not come from his skin color, it comes 
from what is underneath the surface. 

Perhaps there are no answers. 
Perhaps a solution will only be found by 
future generations who actively search 
for answers. 



"It for nothing else, it became 
obvious to me that on a predomi- 
nately white campus, where most 
activities, classes and functions 
consist of mostly whites, at a meet- 
ing to discuss racial incidents and 
problems, there were mostly blacks" 
- Alex Goldstein, Senior 



29 




30 



THE 



CHANGING 



of our WORLD 



The world in 19X9 and 1990 saw 
many changes and University Students 
were at the center of it all. They built a 
statue, the Goddess of Democracy, in 
Tianamen Square but their bid for free- 
dom as well as their statue was crushed. 

They tore a wall down in Berlin 
and started a wave of new freedoms in 
Eastern Europe. Pictures of far away 
Neptune and its moon were printed in 
thousands of magazines. An earthquake 
shook the California coast during the 




INTERNM'L 

L 



World Series. 

Changes occurred here on cam- 
pus as well. The biggest change was in 
the attitude of the freshman class. They 
have entered with an enthusiasm that was 
visible during their elections, and an abun- 
dance of spirit that has been apparent at 
sporting events. There have also been a 
few valiant attempts of the student body 
to change or alter our world. 

The most tangible changes, how- 
ever, have been physical. Our physical 
campus is undergoing extensive alterna- 
tion. There is a certain amount of incon- 
venience to the closing of Grey Drive; 
there is a certain loss of beauty as age old 
trees come crashing down, but there is 
certainly no doubting the impressive, if 
not beautiful, quality of our new art build- 
ing, our new cafeteria and our new gym. 
UNCG is its own little microcosm of 
chance. 




Light. 
Autumn Passage Into Winter Light. 



Assignment for the School of Design 
the week of November 13 to 16, 1989. 



The faculty of Housing and Inte- 
rior Design were pleased to introduce the 
second "Autumn Annual Awards." on- 
November 18. 1989. Each year the 
faculty present the students with a proj- 
ect. This year light was the medium and 
leaves were the vocabulary, and the final 
inspiration was the Berlin Wall. 

The entire design department took 
the week of November 13 off from regu- 
lar classwork and dedicated the time to 
composing and constructing individual 
panels. Fallen leaves and nuts and tw me 
rope were the only resources that the stu- 
dents and faculty were allowed to use. 
When complete the wall was an esti- 
mated 600 feet long with each panel 
measuring six b\ six feet. 

Jerry Leimenstolo. a professor for 
the School of Design, explained the proj- 
ect this way, ""It is a ribbon wall, lor it 
moves like a continuous ribbon. It acts in 
a much different way then the Berlin 



Wall. It lets in light instead of containing 
light. It is a passage from autumn into 
winter — a passage into light. We gave 
the first line of poetry to the students, they 
must create their own line of poetry to 
follow." 








"The contrast. ..that the Berlin- 

ers were tearing the wall down and 

unifying, and that we were building 

one — that was the irony of it." 

- Kelly Greeson, Sophmore 

"The same subject that divided 
the Berlin Wall has brought us 
ogether through our wall — bring- 
ing us together is kind of what this 
project is about." 

- Sharon Gordon, Sophmore 





Belonging to 

a family. 
Belonging to 

HOUSE 



Shaw is appropriately named the 
Internationa] House (I-House). A large 
number of the residents are from foreign 
countries, and most of those from the 
United States are majoring in interna- 
tional studies or foreign languages. This 
lends to the residence hall a unique at- 
mosphere that you cannot understand until 
you walk down the hall and hear two or 
three different languages at once. To sit 
on the front steps and talk or watch the 
people walk by. and to play in the front 
lawn gives a warm feeling to [-House 
residents. 

The special quality of I-House is 



the feeling of belonging to a family. This 
is important, because many of the resi- 
dents do not see their families for a year 
or more at a time while attending UNCG. 
These students need support and a chance 
to feel at home while away from home. 
Living with so many others who are in the 
same situation and people who will take 
you home for a home-cooked meal at a 
real table in a real dining room eases the 
transition and helps soften the homesick- 
ness. 

During the Fall of 1989 this was 
all threatened when Residence Life pro- 
posed to move 1-House into Guilford 
residence hall without the agreement of 
the residents of either hall. The move was 
proposed in order to bring the interna- 
tional students and the international stud- 
ies programs together, and to bring the 
combined international program close to 
the Residential College in Mary Foust 
residence hall. However, the Shaw resi- 
dents pulled together and defended their 
right to live together in what they be- 
lieved to be the one and only I-House. 
Their v ictory shows what is possible when 
a family works together for a common 
goal. One always feels proud to be a part 
of such a family as I-House. 



34 




35 



Mary foust 

RESIDENTIAL C0LLEG1 




The Residential College of UNCG 
has been housed in the Mary Foust Resi- 
dence Hall since the early 1970*s. Today, 
the program is directed by Dr. Murray 
Arndt with assistance from Lecturer Betty 
Carpenter. 

The Residential College program 
consists of a living and learning commu- 
nity for freshmen and sophomores. In the 
Residential College, or R.C.. students are 
given the opportunity to take smaller 
classes, to befriend their professors, to 
participate in special activities, and to be 
truly active in planning their academic 
futures. 

"R.C. students are different from 
other students because of their willing- 
ness to be involved in shaping their ou n 
education and to actively participate in 
all aspects of academic and campus life", 
said Betty Carpenter. "They tend to be 
interactive, spontaneous people." 

Since the death of Dr. Warren 
Ashby. the program's founder. Dr. Mur- 
ray Arndt has been the driving force that 
holds the program together. Sophomore 
Marci Thomas described Dr. Arndt. 
"Murray is a role-model and a friend for 
all R.C. students. I think of him as a wise 
soul that wanders about." 

Although the classes and faces in 
the dorm room change from semester to 
semester and year to year, it is remark- 
able that some issues and opinions sur- 
rounding the program remain the same. 
For instance, ask just about an\ student 
who has ever lived in Mary Foust what 
the} like best about the program and you 
will most likely get the same response. 
As Freshman Kirsten Herr said. "My fa- 
vorite part about R.C. is the closeness. I 

36 



know everyone and we all say 'Hi' to 
each other - it is a friendly place." 

Another aspect of R.C. that most 
of the students agree on is the invalidity 
of the dorm's bad reputation. Many non- 
residents are intimidated by the eccentric 
personalities and rare interests and opin- 
ions of Mary Fousters. "Sure everyone 
here has quirks, but so does everyone else 
on this campus. We are not from another 
planet", said Kirsten. 

A third continuing element found 
within Residential College is the growth 
that students gain from living here. 
Sophomore Calvin Brown describes his 
personal growth here as follows: "Before 
I came to R.C. I considered myself to be 
somewhat naive. ..I have learned more 
about life by living in this dorm than I 
have in any of my classes. 1 learned to 
stand on my own because there is free- 
dom here to voice what I feel." 

One of the consistent parts of R.C. 
is Betty Carpenter. When explaining 
why she has stayed here for 1 7 years she 
reveals, "I really believe in the program 
and the values that are represented, such 
as the importance of human beings and 
the encouragement of students to be 
whatever they can. Furthermore, this 
program offers so much diversity - it is 
never boring." 

"Since I came to Residential 
College. I think I am a lot more 
aware of what is going on around 
me - politically and academically. I 
am definitely mote liberal." 

- Marci Thomas, Sophomore 





"...like a small colorless fowl 
soaring through the lonesome iono- 
sphere with dispositions of deli- 
cacy and wings of thirst. ..thriving 
from day to day in an ever-chang- 
ing world, wanting only to find a 
temporary refuge in a domain filled 
with believers of peace, practitio- 
ners of freedom, and exercisers of 
harmonious education." 

- Calvin Brown, Sophomore 




37 



FRIENDS 



"The best friends I've ever had, 
've made in college." 

- Sherman Canter, Junior 



"The best elixer is a friend." 

- Somerville 



38 





39 




40 




41 



Class of '90 



seniors 



Kendra Adams 

Teresa Addison 

Chrysanthi Agrafiotis 

Saad Ahmed 



Cathy Alexander 

Cynthia Allen 

Darlene Allen 

Kimberly Allen 



Saleh Altralf 

Janice Andrews 

Krista Angell 

Danisse Arauz 



Aniela Arnone 

Mari Jose Atinano 

Kimberly Auman 

Larry Avdlett 




42 




Tracy Ayers 



A I Babe 



Jean Bailev 



Julisa Bailey 



Terri Bailey 
Edwinia Battle 
Patricia Bauer 
Jeff Baysinger 



Kimberly Beach 
Barrie Becker 
Todd Becker 



I Anne Bentzel 



Alice Biggers 
Angelia Blevins 
Phillip Boland 
Vernie Bolden 



Tiffany Bolick 
Sherry Bolinger 
Brenda Boone 
Sandra Boone 



43 



Randy Borders 

Sarah Bostic 

Simone Bowers 

Kimberly Boyd 



Leigh Bozman 

Stacy Brackett 

Aniv Brewer 

Britt Brewer 



Theresa Brislin 

Elaine Britt 

Ann Brook 

Kathv Brooks 



Marc Brophv 

Sheila Brown 

Juanita Bryant 

Edith Buekaloo 



Melanie Buckingham 

Kristy Bunting 

Julie Burgess 

Angie Burgin 




44 




Thomas Burk 
Tomiko Burnettc 
Amie Bums 
Joyce Butner 



Uil.i I iyi'rs 
Elaine Cabinum 
Paul Calcasola 
Bob Callicutt 



Mary Cameron 
Lisa Campbell 
Dawn Cannon 
Desiree Cardwell 



Nancy Carlson 
Jeff Carrick 
William Carter 
Nancy Catoe 



Amie Catron 
Staci Catron 
Jill Chambers 
Amy Chastain 



45 



Cheryl Chauncey 

Carol Childers 

Gloria Cicero 

Sharin Clark 



Sharon Clark 

Betsy Clementson 

Amy Cleveland 

Cheryl Clinton 



Carolyn Cobb 

Ian Cohen 

Mickey Colbert 

Patti Coleman 



Amy Collins 

Christopher Collins 

Andrea Comer 

Robert Conklin 



Dolores Conner 
Laurie Conner 

Dori-Mari 
Constable-Martin 

Allanda Cooper 




46 




IYacey Cope 
David Cox 
Julie Craddoek 
Beth Crichton 



Timothy Crotts 
Michael Crouch 
Robin Cullen 
Marcella Curbelo 



Valorie Currie 
Deborah DSouza 

Jill Dailey 

Deborah Davis 



Lisa Davis 
Melissa Davis 
Marvin Dawson 
Meehelle Degree 



Leslie Deleon 
Elena Demetriou 
Mathew Dempski 
Janet Desamero 



47 



Bruce Dickman 

Sabrina Dillon 

Kelly Dobbins 

Jennifer Dooley 



Brenda Dougherty 

Margaret Dowis 

Todd Drake 

Robert Drakeford 



Bonnie Drye 

Tim Drye 

Donna Dupree 

Earleen Edwards 



Susan Edwards 

Rajaa El-Asad 

Sanaa El-Asad 

Anna Eller 

Penny Eller 

Susan Elskoe 

Amy Essex 

Marianne Fagan 




48 



Daniel Farley 
Sonya Farrish 
Lisa Feeile 
Lianne Ferguson 




John Foreman 
Fay Forris 

Stacy-Joy Freedman 
Elaine Fuller 



Charlene Gaines 
Leeann Gaines 
Crae Galloway 
Gina Garner 



Genevieve Gay* 
Lisa Gibbons 
Christi Gil 
Amy Gilroy 



49 



Mar\ ; Glasco 

Jennifer Glover 

Bonnie Goetseh 

Dana Golden 



Robert Gooch 

Susan Goodwin 

Rita Gordon 

Robin Gordon 



Gail Gore 

Laurel Graves 

Jennifer Greeson 

Melissa Griffin 



Tammy Griffin 

Teresa Guest 

Kristinn Gunnarsson 

April Gunter 



Judith Hageman 

Kim Haithcock 

Julie Hale 

Nikki Halipilias 




50 




Karen Hall 
Shelagh Hamilton 
Sherry Hamilton 
Catherine Hand 



Raehel Hardy 
Linda Hargrove 
Kris Harmon 
Kathryn Harris 



Laura Harris 
Mark Hartman* 
Delisa Hathcock 
Christopher Hauser 



Laura Hawkins 
Leeann Headley 
Stephanie Heath 
Philip Henderson 



Ann Herbst 
Lorri Herring 
Jacqueline Hess 
Julia Hiatt 



51 



Cara High 

Robert Hill 

Tamera Hill 

Ricia Holder 



Emily Holliiield 

Christine Holmes 

Carla Holshoulder 

Anne Hopp 



Katherine Howes 

Elizabeth Howie 

Mario Huggins 

Lisa Hughes 

Lisa Huges 

Rebecca Hunter 

Deborah Hvlton 

Susan Inman 



Howard Irving 
Kayoko Ishikawa 
Sheryle Jackson 
Kimberlv Jacobs 




52 




Elizabeth Jagded 



Bonnie Jenkins 



Thorn Jenson 



Altrea Jinwright 



Joann Johnson 
Susan Johnson 
Suzanne Johnson 
Lisa Jones 



Susan Jones 
Annette Joyce 
Julie Jung 
Gene Keenum 



Audrea Kenan 
Cristy Key 
Kristen Kicklighter 
Kelly Kidd 



Kathleen Killion 
Yvonne King 
Lawerence Kirwan 
Sarah Ann Knolle 



53 



Amy Kranz 

Russell Krausse 

Jacqueline Krieger 

Seott Lange 



Paul Langevin 

Benita Lawrence 

Jane Lawson 

Tina Leach 



Kimberly Lightsey 

Diane Lindsay 

Susan Lishness 

John Little 



Michele Little 

Allen Loyd 

Aaron Long 

Gary Lovell 



Laura Lovette 

Michele Mabee 

Anitha Madhure 

Diane Mahonev 




54 



*■ > 




Jeffrey Maile 
Tonya Maness 
KTia Marshall 

Nicole Martin 



James Massengale 
Sandra Mcaulay 
Jessica Mcgee 
Paige Mcguirt 



Vonzella Mckinnon 
Brantley Mclendon 
Stacey Mclendon 
Pamela Mcmillian 



Linda Mcnatt 
William Mcneely Jr. 
Trisha Mcneill 
Laura Mcpherson 



Cindi Milam 
Ann- Marie Miller 
Rubetta Miller 
Sharon Miller 



55 



Veronica Miller 

Jo Milos 

Minoo Minai 

Janice Miseiilieinicl' 



Melissa Moose 

Michael Morrell 

Mark Morris 

Leslie Morrison 



Mitzi Moseley 

Donna Moser 

James Moylan 

Cheryl Nance 



Dwayne Neal 

Kathrine Newing 

Erika Newton 

Kelli Nichols 



Kellie ONeal 

Caterine Otten 

Michael Pace 

Leslie Page 




56 




Gina Parker 
Pamela Parker 
Keisha Patterson 
Christopher Patyk 



Loryn Payne 
Cheryl Perkins 
Kimberly Person 
John Peters 



Mindi Peterson 
Amy Phelps 
Lisa Pike 
Shervl Pitchford 



Janet Poklemba 
Maurice Poole 
Laura Pope 
Valeria Pritchett 



Walter Pritchett 
Chris Proco 
Lisa Pugh 
Laura Rahn 



57 



Gretchen Ratliff 

Greg Ray 

Tonya Reavis 

Nancy Redding 



Karen Redies 

Jennifer Regan 

Augustus Reid 

Ericka Reid 



Kyra Reid 

Lori Reynolds 

Delia Rhodes 

Janet Rice 



Ann Richardson 

Christine Ritter 

Elizabeth Roberson 

Susan Roberts 



Theresa Robertson 

Sharon Robinson 

Bernd Rohde 

Anissa Rooks 




58 




j Zaneta Roseboro 
I Shannon Royal 

Stephen Rummage 

Sue Sanders 



William Saunders 
Melanie Scarborough 
Joyce Scott 



Shelley Seitz 



Kelly Sells 
Susan Senior 
Keith Seymour 
Ashley Shelton 



Jamie Sherry 
Mark Short 
Jeanna Sigmon 
Nancy Simon 



Dee Sizemore 
Nancy Slate 
Kay Slater 
Veronica Sloan 



59 



Gillean Smith 

Michael Smith 

Randy Smith 

Susan Smith 



Lisa Smithey 

Beth Snider 

Phillip Snider 

Carol Ann Snipes 



Cherie Snyder 

Lowell Soots Jr. 

Belinda Southern 

Susan Southern 



Michele Sparks 

Virginia Spell 

Scott Spratford 

Kathleen Stack 



Charles Stanton 



Jon Stel'ansson 



Thorbjom Stelansson 



Jennifer Stoneman 






m* Aifc 











60 




Cathie Strickland 



Tammy Strickland 



Lori Stuka 



Steven Sudduth 



Curtis Swain 
Daniel Swan 
Laura Syria 
Suzanne Tadlock 



Adnan Taslim 
Tonya Talor 
Teresa Teague 
Bethel Thomas 



Connie Thornton 
Katherine Titus 
Steven Torrisi 
Catherine Tucker 



Karen Tuttle 
Gloria Ukana 
Kathleen Ulmet 
Tracey Umberger 



61 



Teresa Venable 

Barbara Verne 

Denise Vestal 

Yozette Vlahos 



Nancy Waldrop 

Kelly Wallace 

Denise Wallington 
Laura-Ann Warren 



Craig Wasserman 

Amy Watkins 

Cynthia Watson 

Lenora Weathers 



Shawn Webster 



Wendolvn Webster 



Carrie Weerstra 



Deborah West 



Br\'an White 



Nedra White 



.John Whitt 



Jatana Willett 




62 




Melissa Williams 
Michael Williams 
Susan Williams 
Wandanne Williams 



Lisa Wilson 
Melanie Wlngert 
Christopher Winters 
Jane Woodruff 



Lena Woodruff 
Wanda Wright 
Diane Yee 
James Zimmerman 



Jeffrey Zitofsky 



*Graduate Student 



63 



juniors 



Veranita Alvord i 

Melissa Ambrose ; 

Kristine Anderson I 

Amy Asbill I 



Nikki Ashcraft 

Jill Austin 

Keith Ayscue 

Jim Bailev 



Sherry Bailey 

Heather Barnes 

Lori Benfield 

Christopher Bess 



Brian Blauch 

Sherry Blevins 

John Bonitz 

Emily Brady 




64 




Erika Brandon 
Lori Jo Brewer 
j Kelly Britt 

Deborah Bryant 



Lori Bryant 
Kristi Burns 
Camel Caddell 
Dwayne Campbell 



Christy Carroll 
Amanda Carter 
Katie Carter 
Timothy Carter 



Amy Cathcart 
Deborah Chadwick 
Kim Chee 
Amy Cheek 



Wendy Cheek 
Mary Choate 
Melissa Church 
Christopher Clark 



65 



Cory Clark 

Cheryle Clifton 

Kelly Clifton 

Paul Cloninger 



Michelle Clontz 

Sandra Cobb 

Harold Cogdell Jr. 

Angela Cole 



Patsy Collins 

Kristine Contois 

Cheryl Covington 

Leigh Cozart 



Laurie Crider 

Mary Dale 

Dawn Davenport 

Jennifer Davis 



Wanda Dean 

Lvnn Doss 

Sherrie Drye 

Candace Eastman 




66 




Michael Eaton 
Lemuel Edwards 
Kevin Eggleston 
Darrick Enian 



Sherri Emmons 
Leslie- Elain Ervin 
Gwendolyn Faircloth 
Hallelujah Fenburg 



Sharlene Forbes 
Todd Forbis 
Chelle Fulk 
Kathy Futrell 



Stephen Gardener 



Steven Gardner 



Victor Garrou 



Kimberly Gatlin 



Kathv Giles 



Kenneth Greene 



Cora Harper 
Kevin Harper 



67 



Emily Harris 

Rochelle Harris 

Elissa Hattman 

Christina Hawlev 



Mark Hawley 

Syhia Hayes 

Debra Hemphill 

Amy Henderson 



Wesley Hendrix 

Deborah Hill 

Nancy Hill 

Meloni Hinnant 



Dawn Hobbs 

Michele Hodges 

Melanie Hodgin 

Emily Hoeven 



Leslie Hogan 

Rae Holder 

Robyn Holdsworth 

Wendy Holland 




68 




Angela Honeycutt 



Laura Hood 



Gina Ilorton 



Susan Horton 



Michael Howell 
Erin Howie 
Stacey Hoy 
Michelle Huev 



Alton Hughes 
Matthew Huntanar 
Donya Jackson 
Harthel Jarnion 



Cannen Jarrell 
Kimberlv Jeffers 
Billy Johnson 
Cheryl Johnson 



Denise Johnson 
Julia Johnson 
Matthew Johnson 
Stephen Jones 



69 



Cassandra Josey 

Cheryl Junk 

Michael Karras 

Kevin Kasi 



Elizabeth Ken- 
Deborah Ketter 
Kristine Kuhar 
Shannon Lamm 



Bradly Laux I 
Angela Lawier 
Dylan Lee 
Anita Lesane I 



Robin Lester 

Laura Lilly 

Mary Lingerfelt 

Bob Linzer 



George Loekhart Jr. 

Stephanie Lowery 

Susan Lundy 

Esther Mantilla 




TO 




Kerry Manton 
Son] a Marion 
Powell Marshall 
Tabatha Martin 



Renee Martines 
Erie Massaux 
Deborah Mayes 
Laura McAdams 



Wendy McDonald 
Angela McGee 
Teresa McGhee 
Tina McGhee 



Kim Mehlich 
Lori Meiers 
Cassandra Miles 
Kenneth Miles 



Deborah Miller 
Meredith Miller 
Robin Miller 
Paula Mills 



71 



Hannah Mitchell 

Kary Moreland 

Leigh Morton 

Rebecca Morton 



Laura Mundv 

Brian Myers 

Wendy Newcomer 

Laura Niblock 



Desrie Nisbett 

Shannon Oelcher 

Amy Oneal 

Kim Overton 



Lora Parker 

Georgia Peelman 

Tracy Payne 

Natalie Pemberton 



Auburn Perkins 

Tonya Pinnix 

Scott Poole 

Leanna Proctor 




72 




Laura Prohaska 
Adrienne Quick 
Jon- Maria Ramsuer 
David Reninger 



Mary Reynolds 
Angela Rice 
Mack Richardson 
Lisa Robinson 



Melissa Robinson 
Jennifer Romm 
Lisa Rosser 
Susan Rozeik 



Tammy Rumtelt 
Judson Rush 
Susan Ruvolis 



Karen Scott 



Kim Scott 
I Edwin Severs 
i Donna Sexton 

Carolyn Shankle 



m ' 



73 



Corrella Sims 

Suzette Skipper 

John Smalls 

Andrea Smith 



Lissa Smith 

Sara Smith 

Sonya Snider 

Stephen Soliday 



Catherine Somers 

Carolyn Steed 

Lori Stiller 

Gayle Stone 



Zilmond Strader 

Sherri Stuart 

Harriet Swanson 

Leigh Thomas 



Sabrina Thomas 

Andrea Torres 

Virginia Treacy 

Elizabeth Tucker 




74 




Sherry Tucker 
Gregory Tull 
Suzanne Van Ormer 
Judy Versola 



Susan Wallace 
Tamela Wallace 
Casey Wallen 
Katheryn Waugh 



Jeffrey Weeks 
Shayne Weyker 
Scott Whitaker 
Beth White 



Steven Wicker 
Kirk Wilkerson 
Trina Wilkerson 
Jan Wooten 



Kristin Worrell 
Dacia Wrenn 
Sheila Wyont 
Virginia Yip 



75 



Elizabeth Yokley 

Germaine Yongue 

Sherry Young 




76 



sophomores 











*4 fe 




Kimberly Aduss 
Steven Andercyk 
Arlene Appollo 
David Arnold 



Samantha Ashburn 
Christie Ayscue 
Pamela Bailey 
Kim Baldwin 



Nicholas Barberio 
Angela Bennett 
Christine Berger 



Melissa Blair 



Sharon Blake 
Susan Boger 
Glen Boulev 
Lisa Bowlin 



77 



Kendra Bradshaw 



Matthew Bradshavv 



Stephanie Brake 



Pa m Brewer 



Christy Bridges I 

Mary Brinn j 
Beth Broadhurst 

Lamonica Brodie I 



Debora Brown 

Kara Brown 

Susan Brown 

Dale Buie 



Michael Burnette 

William Burns 

Charles Burts 

Lid on Byrd 



Mia Camen 

Jennifer Cantrell 

Melanie Capes 

Melissa Capps 




78 




Sharon Carry 
1 Mamie ( after 
Brian Cattanach 
Heather Christenbni"y 



Chris Clark 
Cheryl Clodfelter 
Pamela Cloninger 
Felicia Cohen 



Johnnie Coleman 
Amy Collins 
Julie Collins 
Sylvia Coltrane 



James Courier 
Christy Cottle 
Maura Courtney 
Amy Coward 



Laura Cox 
Amy Creekmore 



I Krista Crawford 
I Susan Crouse 



79 



Austin Dashiell 

Andrea Downs 

David Drust 

Angela Dudley 



Pamela Duecker 

Joe Durham 

Tracy Edwards 

Jeanie Efird 



Kari Eggleston 

Dana El-Migdadi 

Sherry England 

Tricia Enzor 



Andrew Esposito 

William Farrar 

Joanna Faulkner 

Susan Feagin 

Kimberly Fearrington 

Chris Ferguson 

Anissa Fields 

Cvnthia Fields 




80 




Karen Firth 
Caroline Fisher 
Kimberly Floyd 
Tracie Foels 



Clayton Garrels 
Jennifer Garrett 
Amy Gentry 
Susan Gilliam 



Kelly Gilmer 

Sonji Godette 

I Christopher 
| Goldthwaite 

Cassandra Graham 



Linda Graham 
Christopher Grant 
I Katharine Greenblo 
Angela Greene 



Sherry Greenwood 
Tacey Grimes 
| Theresa Guerrero 
Carla Gurganus 



81 



Christy Gurley 

Laura Gurley 

Misty Hamlin 

Brenda Hargrove 

Michael Harris 

Sharon Harrison 

Mariam Hawks 

Tempest Hemby 



Allison Hemrick 

Erin Hennessey 

Marianne Herrell 

Lara Higdon 



Hayley Hollar 

Heather Holley 

Jane Holt 

Elizabeth Hosey 



Annica Howell 
Shawnya Hudson 
Angela Hulsbrink 
Connie Humphrey 




S2 




Shannon Hunt 
Zhoowan Jackson 
Stacy Jacobs 
Micha Jeffries 



Wendy Jessup 
Christy Johnson 
Shannon Johnson 
Amy Jones 



Stefanie Kehoe 
Patricia Kehres 
Wendy Kellam 
Devonna Kimrey 



Cindy Kindley 
Natalie King 
Amelia Kotlas 
Karen Lail 



William Ledbetter 
Melissa Ledford 
Angela Leonard 
Cynthia Lesueur 



S3 



Jolie Long 

Anna Lowdermilk 

Samatha Lowman 

Deanna Lundv 



Kathy Lvnch 

Stacy Mangrum 

Melody Marks 

Trish Man- 



Laura McClure 

Randy McCracken 

Melissa McKee 

Susan McKenzie 



Mark McKeown 

Pennv McLawhom 

Sonya McMillan 

Jennifer Miller 



Kimberly Miller 

Melanie Mincey 

Kathy Moore 

Sam Moore 




84 




Steven Moore 
Lori Morrow 
Teresa Morse 
Katherine Morton 



Len Morton 

Laura Neal 

Moselle Newberne 

( Gerald Pallaclino 
I 



Ivory Parker 
Lora Parker 
La Verne Part low 
Leslie Pearson 



Lynn Perryman 
Pammie Peterson 
Rhesia Philip 
Twanda Pickett 



Monica Pierce 
Rosoland Pierce 
| Andrew Poole 
Randv Poole 



85 



Julie Potts 

Joanna Poupard 

Matthew Price 

Jimmie Priddv 



Amy Pritchett 

Richard Rammacher 

Jill Raynor 

Matthew Reece 



Alison Reynolds 

Sandra Rhvne 

Clyde Rice 

Janie Richardson 

Dale Robbins 
Orlando Rochelle 
Cathy Rosenberg 
Thomas Sasseen 



Tara Scott 

Eric Self 

Melissa Sellers 

Luara Shelton 




86 








Joanne Shooter 
Marylynn Short 
Julie Sims 
Tina Sims 

Heather Sisk 
Alyssa Slater 
Laura Small 
Marcia Smith 



Melonv Smith 
Rodney Smith 
Chris Sparks 
Shawnya Spurill 



Jill Staggs 
Jennifer Steele 
Michelle Stephens 
Alesa Stewart 



Terry Stokes 
Kimberlev Stover 
Cindy Strickland 
Denise Stroupe 



87 



Sloan Stroupe 

Suma Sundaram 

Paul Sutherland 

Lenge Swaim 

Jennifer Swing 
Laura Swinney 

Lisa Tally 
Latina Taylor J 



Audrey Thomas 

Teresa Thomas 

Karen Titus 

Anthony Tomkins 



Lisa Tucker 

Charlie Upchnrch 

Jennifer Waldrop 

Jennifer Weaver 



Ryan Wea\'er 

Heather Wheless 

Crystal Whitley 

Sonja Wilder 




88 




Donald Williams 
Ken Williams 
Sheryl Williams 
Jacqueline Wilson 



Melissa Winn 
Deborah Wright 
Stephanie Wright 
Inez Yarborough 



Peter Zarbriskie 



89 



freshmen 



Angela Adams 

Michelle Allen 

Ginger Andersen 

Michelle Annas 



Pamela Arnao 

Geoffrey Baldwin 

Meredith Bandell 

Katherine Bane 



Tracy Banket t 

Kevin Barney 

Rebecca Bauer 

Belinda Bennett 



Sherie Berry 

Lisa Blain 

Chaynel Blake 

Tammy Bolds 




90 




Teresa Borre 
Angela Bowen 
Alice Branton 
Ivey Brewer 



Melissa Briscoe 
Marie Broadstreet 
Cindy Brown 
Ingrid Brown 



Reba Brown 
Paulleatha Bruce 
Cheryl Burgess 
Frances Mary Bush 



Cathryn Cabaniss 
Pamela Call 
Allyson Camp 
Troy Canady 



Wanda Candy 
Page Cannon 
Richard Capps 
Sarah Cardella 



91 



Danetta Casey 

Marina Ciaffone 

Stephen Cichy 

Tiffany Clagett 



Catherine Cleary 

Tonia demons 

Rayna Collins 

Laura Confer 



Christa Connor 

Ashley Cook 

Jaqueline Cooke 

Jennifer Cox 



Susie Dale 

Vache Davis 

Lisa Donohue 

David Downer 






.^'W 


Reagina Cox 




Laura Creasv 






W '** ^\ 


lelanie Crissman 






■L v - Jll 


Lori D'Ambrosio 1 




1 


'^W' 



9: 




Lynn Drake 
Ann Drum 
Patricia Duffy 
Nathaniel Durham 



Tanya Edmunds 
Matthew Edwards 
Amy Ellis 
Erik Enberg 



Glovonna Evans 
Tojuana Evans 
Regina Farrington 
Kimberly Ferrell 



Tiffeny Fields 
La'trice Firms 
Ayers Fitzgerald 
Tisa Flolo 



Kristie Flynt 
Monica Ford 
Julie Fox 
Cynthia Frazier 



93 



Benaye Freeman 

Alfonzo Funderburk 

April Gallop 

Carol Gav 



Robin Gentry 

Cheryl George 

Gina Giarracco 

Angela Gibson 



Blair Girimont 

Josette Glover 

Deidra Graham 

Lanette Green 



Martha Gregory 
Melonie Grier ■ 
Kevin Griffin 



Tracey Haigler 



Debra Hall 
Anthony Harris 
Cynthia Harris 
Michelle Harris 




94 




Dawyn Hart man 
Mark Hartman 
Kimberly Havlena 
Simone Hawks 



Sharolyn Hawthorne 
Kimberly Hayes 
Geneva Henderson 
Cathy Hibbett 



Clare Higgins 

Holly Higgins 
Becky Hill 
Debra Hill 



I Ronny Hill 
I Lori Hobbs 
Lanee Hodges 
Helena Holder 



Stacie Hollar 
Kim Holzer 
Rhonda Howard 
Michelle Hunt 



95 



Tracie Hunt 

Frances-Nan Hurley 

Kaci Jemison 

Amy Johnson 



Amy Johnston 

Tracy Johnson 

Wendv Johnson 



Brandon Jones 



Leigh Jones 

Jenifer Josey 

Amy Joyce 

Valerie Judge 



Kishana 

Kanag-Isvaran 

Valerie Kellett 
Shone Kennedy 
Douglas Kilgore 



Laura Kirkman 

Amie Kistler 

April Knight 

Kimberly Knowles 




96 




Virginia Kramer 
Vicki Lai] 
Alisa Laws 
Brianna Leach 



Charles Lefort 
Wendy Lin 
Brad Linton 
Gevon Lockhart 



Dean Logan 
Margaret Long 
Kathleen Mahony 
Felicia Marable 



Bettie Mauney 
Sara Maxwell 
April McCollum 
Brent McCrickard 



Jamel McDuffie 
Jennifer McElroy 
Stacey McGee 
Thomas Mclnture 



97 



Andrea Melchor 

Leslie Miller 

Melissa Mills 

Sheila Mitchell 



Jennifer Mock 

Gregory Monrov 

Amy Moore 

I >,m M v 



Kathrina Moore 

Anthony Morris 

Gwendolyn Morrison 

Kevin Moser 



Yolinda Murphv 

Melissa Murray 

Kim Nance 

Dana Neal 



Erica Newkirk 

Mary Nifong 

Christopher Norris 

Mona Olson 



98 





Susan Ornt 
Anne Overcash 
Jackie Owen 
Mitzi Owens 



Kimberly Pacchino 
Michelle Pegram 
Kris Peluso 
Brian Perry 



Amy Pet rine 
Rhonda Pierce 
Lynelle Pinnix 
Sina Pipkin 



Elizabeth Pitney 
Monica Pollard 
! Kimberly Powell 
Letitia Powell 



Kevin Price 
Marni Pritcher 
Eric Puljung 
Roya Quails 



99 



Lisa Raymer 

Melanie Reel 

Mariea Refour 

Sabrina Robertson 



Jennifer Rosenbaum 
Andrea Roy 
Joseph Rudzinski 
Sandra Ryals 



Heather Sammons 

Howard Sauls 

Margaret Scott 

Samantha Seller 



Sharen Shackelford 
Christina Shaver 
Pamela Shepherd 
Kimberlv Shifflett 



Maryanna Shuping 

Tomika Small 

Candice Smith 

Da\'id Smith 




100 




Vonda Spainhour 
Dana Spencer 
Teresa Steele 
Shannon Stewart 



Carmen Strickland 
Carol Suber 
Melissa Tate 
Jennifer Taylor 



Cynthia Thacker 
Elizabeth Thomas 
Gerri Thomas 
Rhonda Thompson 



Nikki Thornburg 
Kimberly Thrasher 
Chenchutta Thurman 
Jennifer Tracy 



Linh Tran 
Angela Tsang 
Kathryn Turner 
Monica-Rae Turner 



101 



Rima Tvirbutas 

Rachel 
VanBenthuysen 

Bridget Wagoner 

Andrea Walser 



Brenda Weidman 

Karen Whetston 

Anne Whidden 

Devona Whitsett 



Angel Willard 
Hazel Williams 

Elliott Wilson 
Rheada Wilson 



Dana Windsor 

Molly Winkler 

Rachel Wofford 

John Woodard 



Angela Wooldridge 

Lisa Wynn 

Alan Zapata 




102 



"The thing that is best for me is the 
chance to have exchanges with 
students and especially to meet with 
student groups and leaders and talk 
with them." 

-Dr. Jim Allen, 

Vice Chancellor of 

Student Affairs 




104 



3. 
eg 





105 



FACULTY & 
ADMINISTRATION 




UNCG is endowed with versatile 
administration and faculty staffs. As 
Chancellar Moran puts it, "There is a lot 
happening here at the university that 
supplements academic learning." 
Many of the professors at 
UNCG are able to provide 
first-hand exper- 
ience for students, 
but it is up to the 
students to carry 
thisteachingexpe- 
rience over to their 
ownadvan-tageby 
returning the personal interests that the fac- 
ulty has in them. This is the key to a full 
education. 

Many of the professors at UNCG are 
actively involved with research in addition to 
their teaching, creating an enormous 
advantage for students. Professors such as 
Dr. Paul Lutz in Biology, who wrote 
Invertebrates Zoology . Dr. R.R. Hunt in 
Psychology, who wrote Fundamentals of 
Human Memory and Cognition , and Dr. Paul 
Luebke in Sociology, who wrote the 
supplement Tarheel Politics: Myths and 
Realities , all provide outstanding examples 
of professors who carry their field specialties 
directly into the classroom: all have written a 
textbook that is used in their department. 

Then there are other professors, such 
as Dr. Joseph Mountjoy with Anthropology 
and Dr. Jeffrey Soles with Classical Studies, 
who have participated in actual current field 
research. Soles, for example, has been 
traveling to Crete for many years and just last 
year involved seven UNCG students in the 
first excavation in that area. This opportunity 
provides an outstanding stimulus for student 
interest in Archeology. Chancellor William B. 



Moran addresses this idea in saying, "[The 
faculty] bear the double assignment. We 
expect that of faculty, that they will be good 
teachers, and that they will also keep 
themselves intellectually alive by working at 
the frontiers of knowledge." 

UNCG faculty influence students' 
lives to come. For example. Professor Arnold 
Doren is looked to by past students for advice 
and often as a reference in the field of 
photography. Students will take studies that 
will most likely affect their future. Therefore, 
they must realize the unique opportunity that 
has been laid before them and take advantage 
of it. With a teacher-students ratio of 1 : 1 4.2, 
UNCG students receive a lot of one-on-one 
attention. At seventy-two percent, the number 
of UNCG's professors who hold doctoral 
degrees is high in comparison with other 
highly accredited universities. 

Administration also plays an 
instrumental though sometimes subtle part in 
the life of every student. For example, with 
the introduction of James Kiser into the | 
position of Registrar a couple of years ago 
came the implementation of an on-line 
computerized system of registering which 
reduced time and simplified the process of 
registration. 

Dr. Jim Allen. Vice Chancellor of 
Students Affairs, expressed his excitement 
at having the opportunity to make some 
changes in the lives of students outside the 
classroom. The concept of "unlocking doors" 
for the students is shown in the opportunities 
that students have in allowing the faculty to 
aid them in making those ever important 
decisions for their future. 



element 



.experience... communication 



106 




V c> 



*V r 






107 



COLLEGE OF 



Arts and 
o ciences 



At the heart of the 
university is the College of 
Arts and Sciences. The 
College offers most of the 
general education courses 
that form the foundation of 
UNCG's undergraduate 
curricula, and College faculty 
have a major responsibility 
for the quality of liberal 
education on this campus. 
Joanne Creighton, Dean of 
the College, includes 
"strengthening the liberal 
education program" as an 
important College goal, 



along with "building a sense of 
common purpose and community 
throughout the College." 

With eighteen departments, 
ten interdepartmental programs, plus 
the Residential College, the College 
of Arts and Sciences is the largest 
academic unit in the university. It 
includes almost half of UNCG's 
faculty. In addition to their teaching 
responsibilities in undergraduate and 
graduate programs, College faculty 
members are active in research and 
scholarship. Dean Creighton 
emphasizes the "interrelationship of 
research and teaching," not only in 
the two doctoral-granting depart- 
ments, English and Psychology, but 
across the College as a whole. 

"We think our students benefit 
by learning from faculty who know 
what's happening in their discipline 
and who make a contribution to 
knowledge," says Dean Creighton. 





Dean 
Joann Creighton 



Associate Dean 
Henry Levinson 



Assistant Dean 
Robert Cannon 




109 





GERONTOLOGY STUDY 



Within the School of Arts and 
Sciences is an interdisciplinary program 
of study known as the Gerontology 
Program. Gerontology is a field of study 
dealing with aging and the problems of the 
aged. The program involves students and 
teachers not only within the school, but 
across the university. It offers a second 
major or a minor for undergraduates. 
Interest in this field as well as the program 
has increased in the past few years causing 
the program to expand in number and 
influence. 

An important component of the 



program is research in which many 
professors and students are involved. 
Among many others are Dr. Vira Kivett 
with the School of Human Environmental 
Sciences. Dr. Rebecca Adams with the 
Sociology Department, Dr. Virginia 
Newbern with the School of Nursing, Dr. 
William Karper with Physical Education, 
and Dr. Mariana Newton with 
Communication and Theatre. Easily seen 
is the diversity and expanse of the pro- 
gram. Those involved in the program 
meet regularly and invite guest lecturers to 
speak. For 1991, the interdisciplinary 
committee is planning a conference con- 
cerning the Arts and the Aging. And, 
planning has begun for special lectures on 
the biology of aging. 



110 



1 



li 






*(HU ~M' 



Within the eighteen depart- 
ments of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, many choices of majors, 
minors, and concentrations are 
offered to students. Each department 
boasts special programs, projects, 
and activities. 

For example, students who 
major in one of the sciences often 
have opportunity to assist with 
research projects or in clinical 
facilities. Three production programs 
offer students majoring in theatre the 
chance to act, direct, or assist with 
staging. The new Cone Arts Center 
is a focus for students majoring in 
studio art or art history. The 
Greensboro Review , published by the 
creative writing program of the English 
Department, has a national 
reputation. Guest speakers, 
workshops, seminars, clubs, honors 
societies, and volunteer projects in 
almost every department invite 
student participation. 



The recently estab- 
lished Center for Critical 
Inquiry in the Liberal Arts 
department provides a home 
for a number of College 
programs and a focus for 
interdisciplinary interests. 
Programs in the Center 
include the Honors Program, 
Master of Arts in Liberal 
Studies, Black Studies, 
Women's Studies, 

International Studies, 
Archaeology, Gerontology, 
Linguistics, Russian 

Studies, Study of 
Christianity, History and 
Philosophy of Science. All 
of these programs bring 
together faculty and 
students from different 
departments. The Center 
also sponsors special 
lectures and experimental 
curriculum projects. 




Ill 



B 
E 



RYAN SCHOOL OF 

USINESS 

AND 

CONOMICS 



Life at a university often 
seems to be a separate reality, a 
world off on its own, with very 
little connection to the outside 
community. An important key to 
communication between the 
university and the "real world" is 
the faculty of the Bryan School of 
Business and Economics. 

The Business and 
Economics Program at UNCG 
gives undergraduate students 
better exposure to quality faculty 
in the classroom than most other 
schools in the system. With rare 
exceptions, all of the school's 



courses are taught by full-time 
faculty members. And the faculty 
is closely connected with the field. 
Dr. Philip Friedman, Dean of the 
Bryan School of Business and 
Economics, stated, "The majority 
of our faculty do research and 
scholarship and consulting and 
executive training in business so 
that they bring a lot of experience 
to the classroom, and they want 
to teach, and they want to teach 
undergraduates." Theclassroom 
experience is an excellent 
preparation for the business 
world. 

The school sponsors 
helpful activities outside of the 
classroom as well. They have 
internship programs and co- 
operative educational programs 
among other opportunities that 
enhance what is learned in the 
classroom. There is also a wide 
variety of professional and 




honoary organizations where 
students can sharpen their skills, 
learn to work in organizations, get 
some leadership training, and have 
fun with student colleagues who 
are also interested in business and 
economics. They also have a full- 
time advising office specifically for 
business and economics. 

Friendly partnerships 
between the community and the 
university are extremely useful for 
the professional schools like 
Business and Economics and for 
the health of the university and the 
health of the community. It is the 
faculty of this school that is at the 
core of this partnership. 



Dean 
Philip Freidman 



Associate Dean 
James K. Weeks 






Mr. Joseph M. Bryan 



The School of Business and Economics 
proudly bears the name of Mr. Joseph M. Bryan. 
Because of his great contributions, UNCG has 
been able to offer fellowships and scholarships to 
worthy students within the school. Not only has 
Mr. Bryan been influential to UNCG, but he has 
also been involved in the building of programs 
within thirty-three other educational institutions 

Mr. Bryan, at 94, still keeps hours in his 
office in downtown Greensboro, on the 1 1th floor 
of the Jefferson Pilot Building. Oddly enough, Mr. 
Bryan does not feel he is wonderfully successful. 
He does not assume the detached, formal air that 
might be expected. He possesses a down to earth 
personality that reaches out and captivates his 
audience and is more impressive than any cold, 
formal buisness- like attitude could ever be. He 



said the reason he offers such monetary aid to 
these institutions is because, "I knew the benefit of 
an education, I did not have it and I felt the need 
for it." 

The School of Business and Economics 
boasts of his support, as does Greensboro and 
North Carolina. He is responsible for helping 
found the television industry in North Carolina and 
developing the Jefferson Pilot Insurance Corpora- 
tion. His name is also seen on highways and in 
Bryan Park. Born in 1896, Mr. Bryan enjoys re- 
membering when he moved to Greensboro in 
1 931 , during the days of horses and buggies, and 
talking about his nine grandchildren. Mr. Bryan 
stressed, along with an education, the importance 
of hard work, discipline, want, and a willingness to 
work. 




O CHOOL OF 
lit DUCATION 



Reform. Energy. 
Movement. Over the past 
few years, these three words 
have been important to the 
advancement of the School 
of Education. 

One particular area 
of focus has been the 
revision of the elementary 
education and middle 
grades education under- 
graduate programs. Fac- 
ulty in the Department of 
Pedagogical Studies and 
Supervision have designed 
an "inquiry team model" of 
teacher education, in which 
groups of students will work 
with faculty leaders and 
mentor teachers from the 
public schools for two years. 
Many of the courses will be 
taught at the elementary and 
middle schools. Classroom 
teachers will collaborate with 
thefaculty in pinpointing key 
educational issues, finding 
alternative approaches, and 
evaluating their success. 
Admission to these 
programs is very selective. 
Students must pass a writing 
exam, get letters of 
recommendations from 
professors, and earn a 
minimum grade point 
average of 2.75 in their first 
two years at UNCG. These 



new programs attempt to build on 
UNCG's tradition of excellence in 
teacher education and reflect current 
research in state-wide initiatives. 

Another new initiative in the 
School of Education is the Collegium, 
for the Advancement of Schools, 
Schooling, and Education, an 
innovative structure created for the 
purpose of bringing people together 
to resolve educational problems. The 
Collegium has three centers: the 
Center for School Accountability, the 
Centerfor Educational Research and 
Evaluation, and the Center for Edu- 
cational Studies and Development. 
Each center is designed to address a 
specific kind of educational problem. 

All of the changes within the 
School of Education have occurred to 
meet one goal, to bring excellence to 
schools and schooling. Dr. Edward 
Uprichard, Dean of the School of 
Education, says that it is difficult to 
predict what schools and schooling 
will look like ten years from now. We 
face challenges such as integrating 
technology into the educational proc- 



ess and making professional educa- 
tors more sensitive to the needs of 
diverse groups of students. 

"As we move into the twenty- 
first century, our visions about what 
education ought to be must not be 
limited by what we have experienced 
it to be." According to Dr. Uprichard, 
we need to attract the brightest, most 
imaginative students to the education 
profession. Students that are problem 
solvers, thinkers, and leaders. 

"I see a lot of excitement and 
movement in the School," said 
Uprichard. "We're working hard to 
bridge relationships with the school 
systems in the area and the 
community." 

This is an exciting time in the 
school indeed. One activity the School 
of Education looked forward to having 
this spring is the UNCG Young Writers' 
Conference. Attending this affair were 
an estimated 650 youngsters and 
parents, authors from the area, and 
two best selling authors. 



Dean 
Edward Uprichard 



Associate Dean 
Mary Olsen 





Teaching Fellows 



The Teaching Fellows Program is a 
special program, within the School of 
Education, directed by Dr. Treana Adkins. 
[Those designated as Fellows receive a merit 
ischolarship from the program. Although the 
Fellows obtain a degree in education, many 
study within another school on campus, in 
irelation to the subject they choose to teach. 

The focus of the Teaching Fellows 
IProgram is integrating campus and 
community resources in a variety of ways so 
It hat Fellows have a unique and varied 



developmental program. The Fellows also 
participate in a special one-hour seminar that 
is composed of ten sessions during both the 
fall and spring semesters. 

The Fellows go on trips during the 
summer and travel overseas in an attempt to 
develop personal growth. Many find the 
program not only to be a wonderful chance to 
obtain an education, but enjoy the unique 
and exciting opportunities it offers to them 
both inside and outside of the classroom. 




He 

P 

R 
D 



SCHOOL OF 



ALTH 



HYSICAL EDUCATION 



ECREATION 

AND 

ANCE 



The purpose of a university is 
to provide one place that can educate 
humans about the entirety of human 
existence, one place that can facilitate 
the education of the whole human being. 
The process involved in the word 
"education" implies and requires the 
development of the mind. No matter 
what portion of human existence is being 
studied, the fact that it is being studied 
indicates the development of the hu- 
man mind. 

But there is more to a whole 
human being than justa mind. Humans 
also have bodies. They have bodies 
that need developing just as much as 
their minds need developing. And 
despite how traditional it is in western 
culture to refer to the "mind- body di- 
chotomy", the truth is that the mind and 
the body are connected far more than 
many worshipers of either the mind or 
the body would care to admit. AtUNCG, 
the key to the connection between the 
development of the mind and the devel- 
opment of the body is the faculty of the 
School of Health, Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Dance. 

There are four departments 
within the school. They are the Depart- 
ment of Dance, the Department Exer- 
cise and Sports Science, the Depart- 
ment of Public Health Education, and 
the Department of Leisure Studies. 
These are housed in the new Health, 
Physical Education, Recreation, and 



Dance building, which opened in 1 989. 

The Department of Exercise 
and Sports Science includes both the 
traditional one hour physical education 
courses that students from throughout 
the university take as electives, along 
with research and teaching laboratory 
areas, and major professional programs 
that prepare students for careers in 
teaching, coaching, and research. The 
department has laboratories for the 
research in teacher education exercise 
and sports psychology, exercise physi- 
ology, and biomechanics. These serve 
not only as research laboratories for the 
faculty, but also as teaching laborato- 
ries for undergraduate students, and as 
research training laboratories for gradu- 
ate and doctoral students. UNCG has 
the only doctoral program in physical 
education the state of North Carolina. 

The Department of Dance has 
been greatly aided by the existence of 
the new building not only by having 
more studios, but also by having their 
own dance theater. In the past, the 
dance department has only been able 
to have about two concerts each se- 
mester, because that was all the time 
that was available in Aycock Audito- 
rium. During 1989-90, concerts were 
scheduled on almost fifty different days. 
"A performing area is something that 
every serious dance department must 
have to showcase the choreography 
and performance of its students and 
faculty." said Dr. Richard Swanson, 
Dean of the School of Health, Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Dance. 

The Department of Public 
Health Education at UNCG has been 
gaining more attention recently. Its 
work in AIDS and tobacco education in 
North Carolina, along with community 
education of other public health issues 
has earned it around three hundred 



thirty thousand dollars worth of outside funded 
research and training grants. 
The Department of Leisure Studies is primar- 
ily concerned with preparing undergraduates 
to begin professional work in various kinds of 
leisure services. Typical areas of leisure 
service work include management positions 
in municipal parks and recreational depart- 
ments, therapeutic recreation in nursing 
homes and hospitals, and travel and tourism. 
By helping students develop their minds 
and bodies, not separately, but in union, the 
faculty of the School of HPRD is educating 
the students to be whole individuals. 






116 



■ 




Dean 
Richard Swanson 



Associate Dean 
Sarah Robinson 




jf" 



117 



jjSCHOOL OF 

rluMAN 

fc/ NVIRONMENTAL 
O CIENCES 



The School of Human 
Environmental Sciences at 
UNCG is one of the top 
schools in its field in the 
United States. It offers 
science-based programs 
that assist individuals and 
families to improve the 
quality of their lives and the 
environments in which they 
work and live. It is a school 
alert to change and 
innovation in a continuing 
search for ways to provide a 
better education for its 
students, to improve their 
communities, and to improve 
goods and services. 

The programs within 
the school include Food, 
Nutrition and Food Service 
Management, Housing and 
Interior Design, Social Work, 
Colthing and Textiles, Child 
Development and Family 
Relations and Home 
Economics in Education and 
Business. All programs offer 
the masters degree, with the 
exception of Social Work; 
and doctoral degrees are 
offered in four areas — 
nutrition, clothing and 



textiles, child development and family 
relations, and home economics 
education. 

The key to the excellence of 
these programs and to the school as 
a whole is its faculty. Many members 
of the faculty are internationally 
recognized for their scholarship and 
expertise, and are regularly invited to 
deliver scholarly papers at national 
conferences. Three faculty members 
were recognized as being among the 
top 30 scholars nationally in the field 
of family science, and their department 
— Child Development and Family 
Relations — was recently ranked sixth 
in the country. 

Dean Jacqueline Voss said, 
"This recognition further establishes 
the School of Human Environmental 
Sciences as a national leader and 
should make our programs even more 
attractive to potential students." 



"The reason I chose UNCG's 
interior design school was because 
I heard that the faculty made it one 
of the best." 

— Halev Colson, Freshman 




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Dean 
Jacqueline Voss 



Associate Dean 
Edward Powers 




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E C G N O 1VL 1 C S 




n Environment at Sclei 





O CHOOL OF 
JVlUSIC 



The School of Music is largely 
recognized as one of the fop twenty 
music institutions in the United States 
and is the only music program in North 
Carolina that offers degrees all the 
way from the undergraduate level 
through the doctorate level in both 
performance and music education. 
These are large accomplishments for 
a medium sized school 

At present, the size of the 
program is approaching 350 music 
majors, in which 2/3 of those are 
undergraduates and 1/3 graduates. 
The program has a staff of 40 to 50 full 
time faculty. The program has been at 
UNCG since the university opened in 
1891 and has prided itself on the ex- 
ceptional quality of curriculum offered 
to its students. 

Admission to the school is 
tough, and a significant portion of the 
faculty's time is spent recruiting spe- 
cialty-type people. Time is spent 
identifying future talent and making 
contact with them. And all potential 
music students must be auditioned. 

The School of Music is pro- 
fessionally oriented, meaning that stu- 



dents are getting a professional de- 
gree, such as a bachelor of music, 
either in performance or music educa- 
tion. The program has the highest SAT 
scores in the university. According to 
Dr. Arthur Tollefson, Dean of the School 
of Music, the school tries to provide the 
students with a professional education 
so that when they graduate, they will be 
able to pursue a career in music. 

We feel that balance is good 
and our students are going to be pre- 
pared both with a good, solid, general 
education and a good professional 
education." said Dr. Tollefson. 

The school receives honors 
quite regularly. These are honors re- 
ceived on a national basis that repre- 
sent the accomplishments of the school. 
In 1987. the wind ensemble played in 
New York at the Lincoln Center. This 
was the first group from N.C. to ever 
have the opportunity to play there. In 
1988. the opera was ranked #2 in the 
country. Their competition included 
schools that had much bigger budgets 
and more elaborate facilities than 
UNCG. 

The faculty have also received 
a number of honors which contribute to 
the reputation of the School of Music. 
Faculty members have held major of- 
fices in national organizations. This 
year, one composer won first prize in a 
national competition. 

"The idea is that we are doing 
well." said Dr. Tollefson. "The quality of 
the faculty, the students, and the pro- 
gram have the kind of quality that is 
going to get better and better." 

At present, the school's priority 




is to unite its program into one building. The 
building in which the school is currently cen- 
tralized was built in 1 924 and was outgrown 
a number of years ago. The school is now 
scattered among seven buildings. 

"The different sections need to come to- 
gether, not be split apart," said Dr. Tollefson. 




Dean 
Arthur Tollefson 




Assistant Dean 
James Prodan 



O CHOOL OF 
JN URSING 



Besides academics, 
many components are involved 
in becoming a nurse. Love, 
compassion, willingness to work, 
and a knowledge of health and 
illness are all part of becoming a 
member of the nursing 
profession. The faculty works 
with the students both on and off 
campus. The graduate program 
offers four concentrations which 
include gerontology, anesthesia, 
nursing education. and 
administration. The most popular 
program is anesthesia and those 
students involved in it practive at 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital 



in Winston-Salem. Also, a lot of 
faculty come from the Bowman- 
Gray Medical School anesthesia 
department. 

Including both graduate 
and undergraduate schools, 
there are approximately 400 
students. Dr. PatriciaChamings, 
the Dean of the School of Nursing, 
stated, "We have 40 faculty 
members and about half of those 
are have their doctorates and 
have a wide variety of research 
interests". They are involved with 
research concerning the elderly, 
elderly abuse, premature infants, 
maternal loss, and many other 
interests. Theopportunitytobring 
their research to the classroom 
is a great advantage for the 
students in the school. 

In addition to concern 
regarding general research, the 
faculty is also looking to expand. 
The hope is to have a flexible 
master's program, a MSN 
(Master's of Science and 
Nursing) and an MBA that would 




combine nursing and business 
administration. There will also be an 
attempt to recruit LPN's (Licensed 
Practical Nurses) into the 
baccalaureate program to become 
RN's in a quick, timely, and efficient 
manner. 

Nursing is a challenging 
discipline and one that requires much 
work. Dr. Chamings states, "[The 
students are] in a critical area of taking 
care of clients and often lives depend 
on whether or not they're prepared 
and so it's challenging and difficult 
sometimes." Yet, the highly 
professional faculty, prepared through 
educational research, growth, and 
community involvement, are fully 
equipped to teach the nursing 
students how to complete their job 
successfully. 



Dean 
Patricia Chamings 



Associate Dean 
Lynne Goodykoontz 





"The nursing instructors 
provide you with excellent clinical 
experiences and a vast knowledge 
basis to build upon." 

-Linda Pavne, Senior 



VJ RADUATE 
O CHOOL 



Since the masters degree 
was first authorized here in 1921, 
over 10,000 graduate degrees 
have been awarded. Currently, 
graduate students at UNCG 
number approximately 2,700, 
compromising 25 percent of the 
total University enrollment. Over 
sixty masters and thirteen doc- 
toral programs are offered at this 
campus. 

The primary mission of the 
Graduate School is to promote 
and encourage excellence in 
graduate education and research 
and to seek national recognition 
for all doctoral and selected 
masters programs. Toward this 
end, the Graduate School is ac- 
tively engaged in monitoring all 
assistantship and fellowship 
awards to ensure that funds 
supporting students are used to 
attract and retain academically 
gifted students. The Graduate 
School is also responsible for 



approving and endorsing all new 
graduate- level programs and 
coursework and is therefore 
closely involved in curriculum 
oversight and development at the 
University. 

The strong graduate pro- 
grams at UNCG provide many 
benefits to the undergraduate 
student population here. The 
diversity of graduate students 
attending this institution has a 
positive affect on classroom ex- 
perience. Also, the research and 
creative activity of graduate fac- 
ulty is often directly experienced 
in the classroom by both gradu- 
ate and under-graduate students. 
Excellent resources, such as 
Jackson Library, are available to 
graduates and undergraduates. 
Classes are small, allowing for 
excellentinteractionwithUNCG's 
senior scholars, many of whom 
are nationally known for their 
research and publications. 



Dean & Associate Vice- 
Chancellor for Research, 
Robert Miller 




Associate Dean 
Anne Steele 





The Grad Student 



The metamorphasis from an 
undergraduate student to a graduate stu- 
dent is a dramatic change. The graduate 
student focuses his interest and intent of 
knowledge on one spcific subfect. It is a 
subject that envelopes him greatly and 
new opportunities emerge as well as pro- 
spective job openings. Karen Deal, a 
communication major, has found one 
aspect of grad school to be challenging as 
well educational: teaching. She began 
her first year in grad school this year 



teaching a COM 105 Writing Intensive 
Class. One of her students commented, 
"I enjoyed having Miss Deal as a teacher 
because I felt like she was really on level. 
She understood the plights of being a 
student and was encouraging in that way." 
As well as teaching this class, Miss Deal 
also participates as a student in her COM 
561 class. As she works for her Masters, 
she finds the interchanging of teacher and 
student roles to be an fascinating part of 
graduate school. 



Studying Instructing 





"I have a four hour, research 
and applied sport psychology class 
and it doesn't seem like it takes that 
long." 

-Steve Arstupenas, 
Graduate Student 



125 




Purpose:To help new students from China and Taiwan intergrate into UNCG and the Greensboro area, and to 
inerease understanding between Chinese students from different backgrounds. 



126 



& 



3. 





127 



ALPHA 

CHI 
OMEGA 



President: 
JULIE BURGESS 

VP: 

TRACEY PICKER 
DEANNA LUNDY 
BETSY MOORE 

Secretary: 

ALY ZURAMSKI 

Treasurer: 
CASEY SMITH 




PURPOSE: 

Alpha Chi Omega promotes emotional support, social opportunities, 

leadership abilities and scholastic achievement. 



ALPHA 

DELTA PI, 

Zeta Psi Chapter 



President: 
DEBORAH DAVIS 

Executive VP: 
CHRISTY PRATHER 

Pledge Education VP: 
SARAH FERRELL 

Treasurer: 

CARLA HOLSHOUSER 




PURPOSE: 

Alpha Delta Pi is a secret society for women concentrating on scholastic 

achievement, sisterhood, service and social activities. The motto, "we live 

for each other" reflects their ideals of sisterhood and lifelong friendship. 



128 




PURPOSE: 

Alpha Kappa Alpha focuses on sisterhood and scholarship. They do 

national service projects like the Cleveland Job Corps, Voter Registration 

and Project Literacy. They also participate in a wide variety of local 

service projects like Project Destiny and UNICEF trick or treating. 




PURPOSE: 

The American Home Economics Association serves the students in the 

School of Human Environmental Sciences by providing programs in their 

interest and participating in state conventions. 



ALPHA 
KAPPA 
ALPHA 



President: 

LA TONJA HARRIS 

VP: 

TAMELA WALLACE 



Secretary: 
LESLIE HOGAN 
MICHELLE 
YARBOROUGH 

Treasurer: 
MICHELLE HUEY 



AMERICIAN HOME 

ECONOMICS 

ASSOCIATION 



Co-Presidents: 

JUANITA BRYANT 

TRISHA McNEILL 

VP: 

KAREN REDIES 

Secretary: 
MARCELLA 
CURBELLO 

Treasurer: 

LIANNE FERGUSON 



129 



ASSOCIATION FOR 

EDUCATION OF 
YOUNG CHILDREN 



President: 

ROBIN C. MILLER 

VP: 

CHERYL PINT programs 

LEIGH GORDON comm. 

Secretary: 

CATHY LEONARD 

Treasurer: 
TERESA GUEST 




PURPOSE: 

UNCG's Association for Education of Young Children is part of a national 

organization concerned with the development and education of children 

from birth to eight years of age. 



BAPTIST 
STUDENT 

UNION 



President: 

CAROL ANN SNIPES 



Religious Advisor: 
GENEVA METZGER 




PURPOSE: 

BSU provides warmth, fellowship and concern to encourage the creative 

development of personal relationships with Jesus Christ and to serve and 

share Him through the serving of others and sharing of self. 



130 







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1; " 


K ir If? « ' 



PURPOSE: 

Tri Beta recognizes and promotes scholarship in the biological sciences. It 

also promotes biological research and encourages everyone to find out 

more about biology. 



BETA 
BETA 
BETA 



President: 

AN1TUA MADURATE 

VP: 

BARRIE BECKER 

Secretary: 

MIND1 PETERSON 




PURPOSE: 

The CAROLINIAN provides competent, up-to-date news and information 

for the campus community. It also serves as the student voice of UNCG. 



CAROLINIAN 



Editor in Chief: 
PHIL BOLAND 

Associate Editor : 
JEFFREY WEEKS 

Business Manager: 
ANDREW ROSS 



Advertising Manager: 

KEVIN ELWELL ' 



131 



CORADDI 



Editor: 
WILGEHNE 

Other Editors: 
RICQ PATTAY associate 
CHAD CAMERON art 
DAVID ANDREW lit. 
Typography: 
STEPHANIE WRIGHT 
Office Manager: 
DEE JORDAN 
Visual Consultant: 
CARL BILLINGSLEY 











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PURPOSE: 

The CoraDdi invites the UNCG community to submit thier poetry, prose. 

art, drama, music, and photography for publication. The submissions are 

judged by a published author and the best appear in the magazine. 



COMMUTER 

STUDENTS 

ASSOCIATION 



President: 
MICHELLE BOLICK 

VP: 

SHARON ROBINSON 




PURPOSE: 

The Commuter Students Association provides social activities for 

commuter students and it serves as their voice to UNCG. 



B2 




PURPOSE: 

Deliverance Fellowship encourages the spiritual growth of all students 

while exposing them to a different view of Black Culture. 



DELIVERANCE 
FELLOWSHIP 



President: 
DONAGRANT 
L. McCLUNEY 

VP: 

ROBERT CORBITT 

Secretary: 
CHARLENE GAINES 

Treasurer: 
JOHNNY L. LEWIS 




PURPOSE: 
Delta Sigma Pi is a professional fraternity organized to foster the study of 
business, to encourage scholarship and to build a high standard of com- 
mercial ethics and welfare in the business community. 



DELTA 

SIGMA 

PI 



President: 
AMY COLLINS 

Senior VP: 
TINA HAWKINS 

VP: 

SANDRA BOONE 
pledge education 
SUSAN WILLIAMS 
profesinal activities 
ASHLEY INMAM 
chapter operations 



133 



FINANCE, 

INSURANCE, REAL 

ESTATE SOCIETY 



President: 
MICHAEL MORRELL 



VP: 

IAN CZTTZNACH 

Secretary: 

TINA HAWKINS 

ASHLEY INMAN 

Treasurer: 

DAN BLACKMON 



FOODS AND 

NUTRITION 

CLUB 



President: 

DAVID C.MUNGO 

VP: 

WENDY BEANE 

Secretary: 
KEVIN BAILY 

Treasurer: 
KELLY GRIFFIN 




PURPOSE: 

The Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate Society generates and encourages 

students interests in business and employment in financial fields. 




PURPOSE: 

The Foods and Nutrition Club promotes student awareness and interest in 

current topics, issues and career opportunities in the field of Food and 

Nutrition. 



134 





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PURPOSE: 

Gamma Sigma Sigma is a National Service Sorrority dedicated to the goals 

of bettering the school, the community and the nation. 




PURPOSE: 

The Geography Club promotes geography awareness and encourages 

thought about environmental, land-use and urban issues. 



GAMMA 
SIGMA 
SIGMA 



President: 

DELISA HATHCOCK 



VP: 

TERESA MORSE first 

DANA WATSON second 

Secretary: 
JULIE CLARK 

Treasurer: 
JULIE RIVERS 



GEOGRAPHY 
CLUB 



President: 
MAURICE MeKINZIE 



VP: 

SHELAGH HAMILTON 

Secretary: 
BONNIE JENKINS 



Treasurer: 
ALAN WATSON 



135 



INTERNATIONAL 

STUDENTS 

ASSOCIATION 



President: 
SAMER DAHDAH 



VP: 

DENISSE AROVZ 

Business Manager: 
AMANI ABU SHAKRA 



KALEIDOSCOPE 

VIDEO 

YEARBOOK 



Producer: 
BARBIE VERNE 

Production Manager: 
KEITH SEYMOUR 

Director: 
WILIAM BROOKS 




PURPOSE: 

International Students Association acclimizes foreign students of UNCG; 

to provide a family-like atmosphere where students of diffenent 

nationalities interact. 




PURPOSE: 
Kaleidoscope's goal is to film a video documentation of UNCG's 1989-90 

year. 



136 




PURPOSE: 

Lambda Chi Alpha is a fraternity that functions both as a service and 

social fraternity. This year they raised money for Urban Ministries with 

their "Meal of Fortune" project which allowed students to donate the 

money for one board meal to Urban Ministries. 



















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mmm 








K ] 


7^^J 








' ^i^ 



PURPOSE: 

The Masqueraders are a student organization dedicated to the study of 

Broadcasting and Cinema. 



LAMBDA 

CHI 
ALPHA 



President: 
ALAN HUSK1NS 

VP: 

CHRIS PALMER 

Secretary: 
JASON deLEEUW 

Treasurer: 

PAUL SCHWARTZ 



MASQUERADERS 



President: 
MARK DUKES 

VP of Publicity: 

FRAN RUSS ' 

Secretary: 
HILLIARD BALLARD 

Treasurer: 
JULIE JOHNSON 



137 



NORTH CAROLINA 

STUDENT 
LEGISLATURE 



President: 
CHUCK TAFT 



VP: 

KENT ADAMS 



Secretary: 
AMBERLENARD 



Treasurer: 
CRYSTAL MOUNTS 




PURPOSE: 

NCLS provides students with the opportunity to participate in a mock 

ligislature. It helps students with leadership,political , research and 

parlimentary procedure skills. 



NEO 

BLACK 

SOCIETY 



President: 
MICHELLE 
YARBOROUGH 

VP: 

BARBARA DINKINS 

Secretary: 
MICHELLE HUEY 
ERICKA BRANDON 
Business Manager: 
CHARLENE GAINES 




PURPOSE: 

The Neo Black Society cultivates and promotes the awareness of black 

achievements on the UNCG campus and in the surrounding community. 



138 




PURPOSE: 

Phi Beta Sigma seeks to serve all mankind through Brotherhood, Service 

and Scholarship as expressed in its motto: "Culture for service, and 

service for humanity-" 




PURPOSE: 

Phi Mu is a social sorority that strives for scholarship, community service 

and lasting friendships. 



PHI 

BETA 

SIGMA 



President: 

VERNIE L. BOLDEN 

VP: 

STEPHAN GRAY 

Secretary: 
TIMOTHY GODFREY 

Treasurer: 
BLAKE MANESS 



PHI 

MU 



President: 
MAGGIE BURNS 

VP: 

ANNE HERBST 

Secretary: 
SHELLY SEITZ 
CHRISTI GILL 
Treasurer: 
CRYSTAL HOCEVAR 



139 



PHI MU 

ALPHA 

SINFONIA 



President: 
JON CARTER 
SIMMONS 

VP: 

DAVID B. DOBBINS 

Secretary: 
ERIC S. GRUSH 

Treasurer: 

ANDREW NECESSARY 




PURPOSE: 
Phi Mu Alpha encourages and actively promotes the higest standards of 

creativity, performance, education and research in musician America 
while instilling in all an awareness of music's important role in the enrich- 
ment of the human spirit. 



PRESBYTERIAN 
HOUSE 



President: 
MELANIE 
BUCKINGHAM 

VP: 

SHARON FISH 

Social Outreach 
Coordinator: 
NANCY CARLSON 

Treasurer: 
IULIE ELLEDGE 




PURPOSE: 

Presbyterian House is a fellowship group that promotes inner growth, 

religious learning, and the development of long-lasting friendship. 



140 




PURPOSE: 

Sigma Phi Epsilon promotes social activities and helps the UNCG system 

better itself. They have special interest in athletics. 




PURPOSE: 

Skeptical Chemist promotes fellowship among all students with an 

interest in chemistry. 



SIGMA 

PHI 
EPSILON 



President: 

CHRIS LESTER 

VP:: 

STEVE BRYANT 

Secretary: 

KIT HERMANN 

Treasurer: 
BRENT MUNSTER 



SKEPTICAL 
CHYEMIST 



President: 
CINDY MORGAN 



Secretary: 
DEANNE GULBAN 

Treasurer: 

DAN SCHOBAKER 



141 



SIGMA 
SIGMA 

SIGMA 



President: 
CAROLLYN BAYER 

VP: 

GAIL STONE 

Secretary: 

DEBBIE PEDDYCORD 

Treasurer: 
KATHY GILLS 




PURPOSE: 
Sigma Sigma Sigma stresses friendship. Common phrases among the 
sorrority are: "to give much is to receive much" 
and "be faithful unto death. 



ST. MARY'S 
HOUSE 



President: 
DESRIE NISBETT 

VP: 

MIRIAM WHALEY 

Secretary: 
HEATHER BARNES 

Treasurer: 
SHARON CAMEL 




PURPOSE: 

St. Mary's House provides facilities and programs for the ministry of the 

Episcopal Church at UNCG and for that part of Greensboro in which the 

university resides. 



142 




PURPOSE: 

The Student Government of UNCG serves as a bridge between the 

students and the administration. It is the voice of the students. The 

Student Government's biggest accomplishment this year was to gain the 

Chancellor's permission to install condoms in the Residence Halls. 




PURPOSE: 

The NAACP improves the political, educational and social status of 

minority groups on campus by eliminating racial predjuice via awareness 

and enhancement of cultural pluralism. 



STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT 



President: 
ADRIENNECREGAR 



VP: 

DAWN CANNON 

Legislative Assistant: 
BETSY CAMERON 



Attorney General 
MATT REECE 



UNCG 

NAACP 



President: 
TRACEY L. GRIMES 

VP: 

JONATHAN F. WHITE 

Secretary: 
MONA L. FISHER 

Treasurer: 

JACKIE L. ROEBUCK 






143 



UNCG 

ENGLISH 

CLUB 



President: 

TERESA R. TEAGUE 

VP: 

TONYA PINNIX 

Secretary: 
DEBORAHILL 

Treasure: 
PATRICA HUDEIK 




PURPOSE: 

The English Club brings together those who appreciate literature and who 

want to further discuss literary works as well as their own writings. The 

English Club also gives students the opportunity to hear speakers talk on 

job and scholarship related topics. 



UNCG NURSES' 

CHRISTIAN 

FELLOWSHIP 



Producer: 
AMY ASBILL 

VP: 

LORI MEIER 

Secretary: 

TAMMY EDWARDS 

Treasurer: 

LYDIA CAUTHREN 




PURPOSE: 

UNCG's Nurses' Christian Fellowship provides a spiritual support group 

for all nursing students. It also offers services to the Greensboro 

community. 



144 




UNCG 
SKATE 
CLUB 



Chairman: 

MICHAEL V. CROUCH 



Assistant Chairman: 
RICHARD C. SETTLE 



PURPOSE: 

The UNCG Skate Club gives interested students a voice, provides a 

festive learning environment for skateboard enthusiast, and educates the 

public about their sport. They hope to accomplish their goals through 

meetings, sessions, workshops and contests. 



UNCG 

SPARTAN 

CHEERLEADERS 




PURPOSE: 

The Spartan Cheerleaders encourage the fans to be a part of the action and 

to cheer UNCG to victory. 



145 



UNIVERSITY 
MARSHALLS 



Head Marshall: 
DAVID MASTERS 

Assistant Marshall: 
LIANE TOWNSEND 




PURPOSE: 

The UNCG Marshalls is an honor and service organization. The Marshalls 

serve as ambassadors of the university in the surrounding community. 

They accomplish this through a variety of service activities. 



UNCG 

AMNESTY 

INTERNATIONAL 



President: 
BARBARA KLAUS 

VP: 

LARRY K1RWAN 

Secretary: 

DAWN-MICHELE 

SCHOOLS 

Treasurer: 
LEIGH CONNON 




PURPOSE: 

Amnesty International is a human rights organization that works for the 

release of prisoners of conscience, for fair trials for all political prisoners, 

and to an end to torture and executions worldwide. 



146 





^V* 1 




I J 


i Wf ^ 




fiSSOjKyii 


I V- 




r J* v* 


f ^"** „ " V \ 



WESLEY-LUTHER 
HOUSE 



PURPOSE: 

Wesley-Luther House assist people in the academic setting at UNCG to 

discover and fullfill their vocation in Jesus Christ. It forms a primary 

Christian community that gathers regularly for worship in Word and 

Sacrament, to constitute a supportive and caring body of believers 

celebrating life together. 




President: 
IUANITA BRYANT 



Program Coordinator: 
VERANITA ALVORD 

Seervice/ Retreats/Com- 
munity Lifer Coordinator: 
BECKY HUNTER 
TIFFANY BOLICK 

1 lospitality Coordinator: 
LIANNE FERGUSON 



ZETA 

PHI 

BETA 



President: 
MAUDIAJ. WATKINS 

VP: 

VIVIAN CADDY 

Secretary: 
SHERELL 
WASHINGTON 

Treasurer: 
P. DENISE 
WALLINGTON 



PURPOSE: 

The Omega nu Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta stands for academic excellence, 

service to community, leadership, and finer womanhood. 



147 





148 






149 



A 



symbol of UNCG's 
commitment to the upgrade of the 
sports department to Div. I. the 
Health, Physical Education, 
Recreation and Dance (HPERD) 
Building was completed earlier this 
year. 

Three years in the making 
and actually ahead of schedule, the 
new facility opened its doors during 
the summer of 1989 with sports 
offices being the first occupants of 
the building. Other areas of the 
building are used for sports events 
and for classes in the UNCG HPERD 
Department. 

The building is named after 
the department of health, physical 
education, recreation and dance, 
and, contrary to popular belief, is 
not called the PAC. 

According to Sports 
Information Director Ty Buckner, 
the new $16.2 million building is 
truly a commitment to a growing 
sports presence at UNCG. 

"(The HPERD) allows us to 
showcase our outstanding teams as 
well as accommodate spectators in 
a first-class manner," he said. 

Buckner also said that the 
HPERD building is a step in the 
right direction for the athletic 
program at UNCG. 

"The University is headed in 
a very positive direction in student 
athletics and we have every 
intention and hope of keeping that 
in Div. I," he said. Buckner pointed 
out, however, that most of the 
building is not devoted to sports, 
but rather to the HPERD 
Department, with much space going 
towards administrative offices. 

Buckner did explain that the 
sports department at UNCG will 
benefit greatly from the addition. 

"While being primarily an 
education building, we (the sports 
department ) are proud that athletics 
has a place in this outstanding 
facility." 

150 








§ 



3. 



\ 







151 



Mens 



S OC CE R 





-ROSTER- 


No 


Name 


2 


Mark Fulk 


3 


David Ulmsten 


1 


Kevin Reifschneider 


5 


Rick Johnson 


ii 


Bill Sutherland 


7 


Buckley Andrews 


- 


Mike Gailev 


9 


•Jason Haupt 


in 


Hilmar Bjornsson 


1 1 


Chad Gorby 


12 


George Hoylel 


M 


Pat Preston 


15 


Josh Feinberg 


te 


Mark Mullins 


17 


Jon Stui-mfels 


18 


Scott Brittsan 


19 


Billv Heaney 


20 


Mark Mavhew 


21 


Brian Geissler 


- 


Chris Wode 


- 


Ted Woodings 


- 


Anthony DiFoggio 


- 


Andv Smith 


- 


Chris Albert 


Head Coach- 




Micheal Parker 


Asst. Coaches- 




Peter Broadley, 




Charles Dailey, 




Eric Vaughter 



152 




T 












\ 








J 






OPPONENT 


1 
OUTCOME 




N.C. State 


2-0 


(Li 




Duke 


3-1 


(Li 






Greensboro College 


3-0 


(W) 






UNC Asheville 


7-1 


iW) 






Methodist 


6-0 


(W) 






Lynchburg 


10-0 


(W) 






Charleston 


8-4 


(W) 






Wake Forest 


1-0 


(Wi 






Barry 


9-0 


(W) 






Davidson 


5-3 


(W) 






C.W. Post 


4-1 


(W) 






George Washington 


1-0 


(L) 






Catawba 


1 


-1 


(T) 






Rollins 


3 


_2 


(W) 






Tampa 


3 


-1 


iW) 






Virginia Tech 


2 


-0 


(W) 






USC Spartanburg 


3 


-0 


(Wi 






UNC Chapel Hill 


4 


-3 


(Wi 






Coastal Carolina 


3 


-0 


(Wl 






Longwood 


7 


-0 


(W) 






Davis & Elkins 


5-0 


(W) 






Tampa 


2-1 


<W> 






Gannon 


4-2 


(W) 






Ne 


* Hampshire 


3-1 


(Li 










\ 










1 




J 



"This was one of the best 
teams I've played on, in the way of 
comradery. Our chemistry kept us 
together. Next year we should do 
very well again, and compete in the 
playoffs." 

- Anthony DiFoggio 




They Came, They Saw, They Scored, and Scored, and Scored... 



The 1990 UNCG men's soccer team 
carried on the tradition of soccer excellence 
by finishing the season second in the na- 
tion at the Division II level. Following a 
magnificent season which included victo- 
ries over nationally ranked Division I 
! schools such as UNC-Chapel Hill and Wake 
Forest, the Spartans reached the finals of 
the NCAA tournament before New Hamp- 



shire College would freeze their hopes of 
yet another soccer championship. 

The Spartans defeated Gannon 
College ( PA ) 4-2 in the national semi-final 
game before a large boisterous crowd at the 
UNCG Campus Field. The next day proved 
to be a chilling experience for the Spartans. 
With the temperature dipping into the 
teen's. New Hampshire College definitely 



had the winning edge in the national 
championship, with a s final score of 3-1. 
The 1989-90 UNCG soccer season was 
highlighted by the final national ranking 
as well as an outstanding individual effort 
by junior midfielder Jason Haupt. Haupt 
led the entire nation, at any division level, 
in scoring with 28 goals for the year. 



153 



W o m e n s 



S O C CE R 





ROSTER 


NO 


Name 


9 


Paula Shelton 


3 


Lisa Leisten 


4 


Sandy Rupolo 


5 


Trade Foels 


6 


Mandy Owen 


7 


Michelle Dines 


8 


Rori Rushing 


10 


Heather Duryea 


12 


Janice Wols 


13 


Robvn Gurinsky 


14 


Elizabeth Auwarter 


15 


Lisa O'Brien 


17 


Kara Lee 


IS 


Meghan Guarnotta 


19 


Hollv Peterson 


20 


Jill Adams 


21 


Melyssa Kemp 


22 


Tiffany Kyle 


— 


Laura Mussulman 


— 


Kelly Hobbs 


Head Coach- Jack Poland 


Asst. Coach- Lori Henry 




154 







OITONKNT 



Buffalo 

UNC-Chapel Hill 

Maryland 

Roanoke 

Virginia 

Davidson 

Missouri-St. Louis 

Barry 

N.C. State 

Charleston! WV) 

Elon 

Methodist 

KeeneSt.l NH) 

Adelphi 

St. Andrews 

Duke 

ErskinelSCl 



lW> 

1 (Wl 

2 iWi 
(W) 

(L) 
10-01 W) 

1 IT) 
1 (Ll 
1 (L) 

(W) 

1 (W) 
1 (W) 
1 (W) 
iWi 

(W) 

1 (L) 
(W) 



"Since CBS dumped me, I 
have done play-by-play for UNCG's 
Women's Soccer. What is life 
coming to?" 

- Brent Mussburger, 
Ex-CBS announcer 





155 



Mens 



B ASKE TBALL 



NO. 


NAME 


10 


Keyford Langley 


14 


Eric Ward 


15 


Chad Harris 


20 


Yusuf Stewart 


24 


Tooey Loy 


25 


Greg Stauffer 


30 


Chris Collins 


32 


Tonv Smith 


34 


Pat Faber 


42 


Steve Hunter 


44 


Gary Cox 


45 


Guv Shavers 


52 


Marty Kornegay 


Head Coach- Bob McEvoy 


Asst. 


Coaches- Rod Wyatt, 




David Wolff, 




Kirk Chandler 




T%v 



$*&& «% 



OPPONENT 

Paine (Ga. ) 
Winston Salem State 
Davis & Elkins 
East Carolina 
Winthrop 
Virginia Military 
Armstrong State 
Mt. Olive 
Kentucky State 
PacelN.Y.) 
Rollins 
Eckard 

Armstrong State 
Cornell (N.Y.) 
Wofford 
Longwood 
Fayetteville St. 
USC Spartanburg 
N.C. A & T State 
Pembroke State 
Davis & Elkins 
Pembroke State 
USC Spatanburg 
Greensboro 
Fayetteville St. 
Wofford 
Longwood 




OUTCOME 

77-73 I L) 
67-75 (W) 
78-70 (L) 
60-57 (L) 
85-78 (L) 
76-50 (L) 
89-86 (L) 
6-73 (W) 
-81 (L) 
7-60 ( L) 
3-73 (L) 
1-56 l L) 
7-60 (L) 
8-56 (L) 
76-72 (L) 
73-70 (W) 
96-82 (L) 



57 (L) 

75 (L) 

76 (L) 
79(L) 

63 (L) 

64 (L) 

57 (W) 
62 (W) 

58 (L) 

77 (L) 



"Our biggest problem was 
the fact that our team was a young 
team. ..we also had some injuries 
that made it kind of tough." 

— Pat Faber 





157 



W o m e n s 



BYV KJ 111 W 11 a ^f 

A SKE TBA L L 



No. 


Name 


12 


Christy Whitehurst 


14 


Beth Dumll 


22 


Mickv Havwood 


23 


Julie Bright 


24 


Stephanie Johnson 


30 


Jana Henderson 


33 


Karen Jordan 


35 


Chris Holee 


40 


Tracev Young 


43 


Donna Sneed 


44 


Kristin Lavelle 


53 


Alicia Wilbanks 


Head Coach- 




Lvnne Agee 


Asst 


Coaches- 




Carol Peschel, 




Julia Weaver 




^^ 








x d 




1 r > P 




wL 




!wk !l 






158 










OPPONENT 


OUTCOME 


Longwood 


96-70 (W) 


Missouri-Rolla 


66-53 (W) 


Cameron lOkla.) 


88-74 (W) 


West Texas State 


83-75 (L) 


Catawba 


82-58 (W) 


UNC Wilmington 


97-87 (W) 


N.C. A & T State 


80-66 (W) 


Calif-Riverside 


100-90 (W) 


Cal Poly Pomona 


93-61 ID 


Chapman (Calif.) 


90-55 (L) 


Lincoln Mem. (Tenn. 


) 98-97 (W) 


Babtist(S.C) 


90-65 (W) 


Longwood 


89-79 (W) 


Davis & Elkins 


81-71 (W) 


UNC Charlotte 


78-63 (L) 


N.C. A & T State 


67-54 (L) 


Pembroke State 


76-66 (W) 


N.C. Central 


80-66 (Wl 


ST. Augustine's 


105-91 (W) 


USC Spartanburg 


66-56 (L) 


Elon 


100-56 (W) 


Catawba 


84-69 (W) 


Winthrop 


73-63 (Wl 


Pembroke State 


93-62 (W) 


UNC Charlotte 


98-71 (Ll 









"We faced many tough op- 
ponents this year as we're moving 
to Division I and still maintained a 
good record. We worked hard and 
worked together and that's what it 
takes to be a good team." 

-Chris Holec 



"Some nights we played to 
our abilities and many nights, we 
didn't. The best is that we held 
everything together and finished 
20th in the nation. That's the mark 
of a good team and good coaching. 
Too bad the NCAA did not feel the 
same." 

-Karen Jordan 




159 



VolleybalL 





ROSTER 


X. 


Name 


2 


Holly Higgins 


4 


Christie Ayscue 


6 


Jill Holloran 


9 


Susan Johnson 


Ki 


Tanva Edmunds 


11 


Julie Parish 


12 


Sherrv Watt 


13 


Kathy Quaintance 


M 


Missi Olson 


15 


Alice Branton 


Head Coach- 




Tere Dail 


Asst. Coach- 




Tami Perkins 


Student Asst. Coach- 




Gia Orlando 




160 












OPPONENT OUTCOME 




Augusta 


W 


Campbell 


W 


Virginia Tech 


L 


Davidson 


W 


N.C A&T State 


W 


Jacksonville St. 


W 


Wofford 


W 


Lenoir-Rhvne 


W 


N.C. Central 


W 


West Georgia 


W 


Jacksonville St. 


L 


Radford 


W 


St. Augustine's 


W 


UNC Charlotte 


W 


Johnson C. Smith 


W 


N.C. Central 


W 


Elon 


W 


UNC Wilmington 


w 


Appalachian State 


w 


Winston-Salem State 


w 


Fayetteville State 


w 


East Carolina 


w 


Campbell 


w 


Coastal Carolina 


w 


Davidson 


w 


Winthrop 


w 


Winston-Salem State 


w 


Campbell 


w 


St. Augustine's 


w 


Davidson 


w 


Livingston 


w 


West Georgia 


w 


Jacksonville State 


w 


Rollins 


w 


North Alabama 


L 


Radford 


w 




Davidson 


w 







'* We were very pleased with 
our record for the 1 989- 1 990 season, 
I was especially pleased to end my 
volleyball career with such an 
impressive record." 

- Sherry Watt 







L-ltjfc 




-^ 


JHm> 




W o m e n s 



S oftbalL 





ROSTER 


No 


Name 


2 


Nita Mabrv 




Lorri Parrott 


I 


Rhonda Edenfield 


6 


Tamara Wamslej 


s 


Janice Wols 


Ki 


Amv Reed 




Cheryl Whalen 


i: 


Brenda Willis 


14 


Lisa Oilman 


16 


Joan Weesies 


17 


Trish Miller 


IS 


Libby Coal son 


23 


Kelly Councilman 


Head C 


>ach - 




Mary Jo Campbell 


Asst.C 


lach - 




Jane Hamel 



16: 





"This is the best team I've been 
on since I've been here. We get 
along together and have strength at 
every position." 

- Joan Weesies 






"I think we have all kept the 

same goal in mind to play together 

and stay together. Our immediate 

goal is to come out way above 500% . 

- Cheryl Whalen 



163 



T Mens o 
ENNIO 



ROSTER 

John Morris 
Mike Weidl 
Bobby Linzer 
Derek Gamble 
Bothwell Gonas 
Jason Kinder 
Brian Whiteman 
Jeff Kopelman 
Sean Lucas 
Scott Boehringer 




"We have a lot of talent. We 
hope everyone can contribute and 
play to their potential so we can 
have a very sucessful season. 

-Jason kinder g 

m 



W o m e n s 



T w o m e n s x->j 
ENNIO 



ROSTER 
Kim Vaughan 
Wendy Mozingo 
Alexandra Simm 
Joanna Bias 
Alexandra Pauly 
Luanne Sandberg 
Brigid McNeil 
Laurie Clear 

Head Coach- 
Andreas Koth 

Asst. Coach- 

Ingrid Gonesh 




"The program here is headed 
in the right direction. With the 
caliber of players we have we wil 
be able to compete well at the divi- 
sion one level." 

- Kim Vaughn 



165 



Mens 



GoTF 




166 



L 



W o m e n s 



ACROSS 



E 




» ■ 


• m 






/JH^v 




w- 


U t. v « ^.^ 




f 







ROSTER 

Beth Larsen 
Laura Larson 
Michele Coffey 
Vicki Swartz 
Heidi Lathell 
Holly Robinson 
Monica Ferguson 
Rima Trivbutas 
Alex Lewis 
Stephanie Havadas 
Robin Foster 
Paula Battalia 



"Although we were young 
and inexperienced, the future of the 
team looks bright. We are gaining 
experience everytime we play and 
hopefully that will help guide this 
team in the future." 

-Beth Larson 



167 



Clubsports 



ROSTER 




Name 


No 


Scott Muesel 


5 


Mike Lacev 


6 


Ian Cohen 


7 


Steven Harbour 


9 


Chadwick Moore 


10 


Ed Rosenbladt 


21 


Chuck Brewer 


30 


Derrick Spatoric 


14 


Casey Campbell 


29 


John Lucchese 


23 


Peter Zabriskie 


15 


Sean McCabe 


19 


Kevin Parker 


27 


Jeff Smith 


20 


Eric DiPreta 


26 


Mark Piosco 


28 


Rob Williams 


16 


Johnston Hobbs 


25 


Head Coach- Bill Gist 



ACROSS^ 



L© -9a 


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"It was a very special feeling 
winning our first game against 
Appalachain State. We have worked 
very hard to start the lacrosse 
program here and even harder to 
make it suceessful." 

-Chad Moore 



168 




"I love my lacrosse stick. It has been very good to me. We work like 
a finely tuned machine. But no, seriously, pull my finger! Actually when 
we do play together, the team has faired very well. We hope the tradition 
of lacrosse will continue and grow here at UNCG." 

-Just kidding, Steven Harbour 



169 



Considering More Sports... 





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"Although we would have 
liked to win more games I was 
impressed with how the team pulled 
together as the season progressed. 
With the varsity program coming in 
the fall hopefully some attitudes 
will change." 

-Kirk Wilkerson 



171 



"UNCG has a lot of hidden 
qualities that someone who doesn't 
go here can't see. Anyone and 
everyone can fit in. No one has a 
reason to be lonely here." 

- Tonva Burton, Freshman 



172 





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1 73 




So what did you do this 
weekend? There was a time when 
the answer to a question like this at 
UNCG was a sigh and a disap- 
pointed "nothing." Suddenly, there 
was a ray of hope. This year a cure 
to weekend boredom was discov- 
ered thanks to a number of on- 
campus activities, everything from 
coffee hours to concerts. Students 
enjoyed parties, dances, films, per- 
formances, and lectures. They 
participated in service projects, 
signed petitions, attended meetings, 
and, during their spare time, re- 
laxed. They also planned events, 
whether they were from the Cam- 
pus Activities Board, a sorority, or 
just a group of friends interested in 
having a good time. There hardly 
seemed to be any time to be bored. 
"There are many things to do here," 
remarked senior Kim Smith, "if 
people would get off their lazy asses 
and open their eyes." In fact too 





174 






many events occured to record in 
one volume of the Pine Needles . 
For example... 

Fall Kick-Off: What is a 
better way to start off the long aca- 
demic year than with a party? On 
August 24, the Campus Activities 
Board and many other campus or- 
ganizations took over College 
Avenue with booths, bands, and 
balloons. On their way to their first 
classes, students were able to stop 
for a snow-cone and enjoy live en- 
tertainment by bands and magicians. 
According to one of the event's or- 
ganizers Cindy Saintsing, Fall Kick- 
Off is more than just a street party. 
It's a chance to "let people know 
there are different types of organi- 
zations besides academic or relig- 
ious ones on campus." 



175 



Liz Story and Phillip 
Aaberg: These two well known 
pianists performed in Aycock Au- 
ditorium on September 8 as part of 
the University Concert/Lecture 
Series. Many other famous per- 
formers were featured later in the 
year in the series. 

Carl Rosen: If you ever 
wanted to see Billy Joel in concert 
but could not afford tickets, then 
you could have attended this man's 





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performance in Benbow Lounge 
for CAB's Second Tuesdays enter- 
tainment series. He sounded like 
the real thing but did not cost half as 
much! 

Sigma Sigma Sigma at the 
rock: The sorority collected money 
for the Page Memorial Fund. 

Parents Weekend: Parents 
from all over North Carolina and 
elsewhere arrived on campus Sep- 
tember 30 to visit their sons and 
daughters attending UNCG. They 
and their children were entertained 
by tours, speakers, and even car- 
riage rides through the campus. 

Oklahoma!: The classic mu- 
sical was performed by the Theatre 
and Music Departments in Aycock 
Auditorium from October 4 through 
October 8. 



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177 





City Stage: For a weekend 
the streets of downtown Greens- 
boro were emptied of traffic and 
filled with celebration. Plenty of 
bands, vendors, and food were on 
hand for the fun during October 6 
through 8. 

Amnesty International Sec- 

178 



ond Annual Human Rights Here 
and Now Concert: A number of 
bands performed all afternoon and 
into the evening in Cone Ballroom 
sponsored by UNCG's chapter of 
Amnesty International. 

Take Back the Night: A an- 
nual nationwide event, the Take 
Back the Night march serves to 
raise general awareness of rape and 
other sexual crimes. An estimated 
300 people participated in this year's 
march sponsored mainly by 
Women's Connection. The crowd 
marched through high safety risk 
areas of campus, holding candles 
and singing. 

Condom Petitions: While 
walking into the cafeteria, few stu- 
dents expect to be asked to express 
their opinions on condom machine 
installation in dormitories. Yet the 
North Carolina Student Legislature 
did so. providing students with an 
opportunity to sign a petition call- 
ing for such vending machines. 
Let's hope the machines will take 
dollars. 






Alcohol Awareness Week: 

In an effort to curb drunk driving, 
many organizations, including the 
Panhellenic council, sponsored 
campus acknowledgement of the 
nationally renowned Alcohol 
Awareness Week. Efforts included 
the placement of a car, actually 
involved in a drinking related acci- 
dent, in front of the Elliott Center. 
Homecoming: The celebra- 
tion started on Thursday Oct. 26 
with a pep rally, Mr. Homecoming 
Queen Contest, Scavenger Hunt, 
bon fire, and a fire works display. 
The homecoming parade and games 
were held on Saturday Oct. 28. Both 
men's and women's soccer teams 
won victories before a spirited 
crowd. 





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179 



During half time of the 
homecoming game, the Homecom- 
ing Queen. Melonie Roberts, and 
her eight member court were 
crowned. Besides these traditional 
homecoming events, the group B- 
52's performed to a sell-out audi- 
ence in Aycock Auditorium. CAB 
also sponsored the showing of the 
film Coining to America as well as 
a talent show. 

Career Day: Looking for a 
job? Employers from North Caro- 
lina and other states filled Cone 
Ballroom on November 9, all will- 
ing to read resumes and answer 
questions of seniors wishing to 
"make it" in the real world. 



National Geography 
Awareness Week: For the week of 
November 12 through 18 geogra- 
phy students all over the nation and 
here at UNCG celebrated their 
favorite subject. 

Blue Day: The issue of 
homosexuality at UNCG was 
brought to campus-wide attention 
on November 15, as the Gay and 
Lesbian Student Association 
(GLSA) at UNCG, one of North 
Carolina's largest gay student asso- 
ciations, promoted "Blue Day". 
Homosexual and bisexual students 
all over campus were encouraged 
to wear blue that day to show sup- 
port for their rights. 

Smoke 'Em Out!: UNCG 
was lit up with activities for the 





ISO 




Great American Smoke Qui on 
November 16. A bulletin board 
was put up in the Health Center, 
buttons and the very popular "Be 
Beary Healthy" stickers were given 
out, and information about various 
ways to quit, including the adopt-a- 
smoker program was offered at a 
table in the cafe. 




Hell No, We Won't Go!: 

Students from Shaw International 
House were up in arms, not about 
the roaches in their dorm but rather 
about being forced out of their dorm. 
In an effort to consolidate the Inter- 
national House and the International 
Studies Program, the administra- 
tion decided to move the Interna- 
tional House to Guilford dorm. 
Residents of both dorms protested, 
and the decision was changed. 

Rock Pictures: A poster 
sale was held on December 4 in 
EUC. All sorts of rock posters from 
U2 and Bob Marley to Debbie 
Gibson and Madonna were on sale. 




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182 




Some were imported from Europe, 
some were original pieees from 
concerts. They even had Sgt. 
pper's band posters from twenty 
years ago. "Some people like to 
buy displays instead of actually 
ripping them off the wall," said 
Glen Faltin, Freshman. 

Condom Action: After a 
survey sponsored by Student Gov- 
ernment and the Residence Hall 
Association revealed that 89.05% 
of UNCG students support install- 
ing condom vending machines on 
campus, the Student Legislative 
Assembly finally passed a resolu- 
tion supporting the installation of 




the machines on their January 30th 
meeting. The vote was l c ) in favor 
with 3 abstentions. 




183 





5? .' 




Black History Month: The 

University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro ushered in the Black 
History Celebration 1990 after one 
oi the most significant gubernato- 
rial elections in the nation's history. 
Lawrence Douglas Wilder. 58. 
became the first black man ever to 
be elected governor in Virginia or 
any other state. UNCG has recog- 
nized February as Black History 
Month for several years. This year's 
events included a panel discussion 
on the all-college read. Civilities 
and Civil Rights; a Black History 
Kickoff reception featuring the jazz 
band /// the Black; A Walk Down 
125th Street, a dramatic production 
with a focus on black literature; a 
discussion. Ethic Notions; a movie. 
Lean on Me; a production of 
Dreamgirls; the Chuck Davis Dance 
Troupe; and the Neo Black Society's 
Niiiht Owl/ Talent Show. 



184 




Education Career Day: On 

February 5, representatives from 
over 1 00 school systems from across 
the United States congregated in 
Cone Ballroom for Education Ca- 
reer Day '90. Representatives came 
from as far away as Oxnard, Cali- 
fornia to recruit UNCG students to 
teach. 

National History Day: On 
March 16. the UNCG History de- 
partment sponsored a presentation 
by high school students in EUC in 
honor of National History Day. The 
project included papers as well as 
visual aids on such topics as foren- 
sic science, abortion, pollution, 
lasers, money, helicopters, and arti- 
ficial limbs. 








185 




Condom Decision: On 

March 30, Chancellor William 
Moran approved the installation of 
the condom vending machines in 
the first floor bathrooms of the 22 
residence halls on campus. Educa- 
tional material regarding sexually 
transmitted disease will be avail- 
able at the vending sites. Also, 
condoms will be sold at the book- 
store in Elliott University Center. 
StellarCon: On April 6, 7. 
and 8, The Science Fiction Fantasy 
Federation (SF3) hosted "Stellar- 
Con XV: A New Beginning". Stel- 
larCon is SF3"s annual scifantasy 
convention. This year the conven- 
tion took a new direction and fo- 
cussed more on guest speakers and 
less on gaming than it has in the 
past. Fourteen speakers were sched- 
uled, including Hugo and Nebula 
Award winner Frederick Pohl. 
Despite the new emphasis, sight- 
ings of renegade earners were re- 





186 




ported around campus. 

It Happened at UNCG!: 

Spring Fling began on Monday, 
April 16. with the movie Field of 
Dreams. On Tuesday there was a 
Video Dance Party in the Quad, and 

ireworks. Wednesday's events 
included the CSA Deli and a giant 
Twister game in the soccer field. 
The Outdoor Festival was Thurs- 
day, which included Student 
Booths, food, the Health and Well- 
ness Fair, the Class Council Scav- 
enger Hunt, and roving artists, fol- 

owed by Comedian Jordan Bradly 
that evening. Friday's Pre- Week- 
end Party included the RHA Lip 
Sync Contest, the Black Greek Step 
Show, and the dance band Perfect 
Fitt, followed by more fireworks. 



187 




Graduation: May 13 
marked graduation for the class of 
1990. The speaker was Dr. John 
Hope Franklin, a professor of his- 
tory at Duke University. He gave a 
speech directed towards the future 
entrance of the University into 
division one. He cautioned against 
the loss of academic standards, men- 



190 





tioning Universities who became 
immersed in scandal which re- 
volved around their sports depart- 
ments. He told the graduates not to 
stop reading. He advised the stu- 
dents not to forget their communi- 
ties and the people they have the 
potential to help. He was a capti- 
vating speaker, whose enthusiasm 
and idealism was appreciated by 
the graduates. Graduation is ritual 
that marks an official ending to at 
least one period of schooling, thus 
it included the rituals that are so 
much an imminent part of the cere- 
mony, such as the ringing of the 
University Bell, the robes, and pro- 
cessions, that mark the a rite of pas- 
sage. 





191 



DEAD HEP\T> 




192 



SOCIOLOGY 



This summer I was able to particapate in a 
most extra-ordinary summer school event. As 
part of Dr. Rebecca Adam's Applied Social 
Theory and Qualitative Research Methods (SOC. 
501-502). I spent the better part of the summer 
learning advanced social theory and putting these 
skills to good use at the eight Grateful Dead 
shows I attended. 

The class experience began with me 
filling out an application, and, upon being ac- 
cepted. I was registered for summer school. The 
classroom experience alone was facinating. Be- 
cause we recieved six hours of course credit, the 
first portion of the class was spent entirely in the 
classroom. Many interesting conversations re- 
sulted. We were given an extensive crash course 
in sociological theories and research methods be- 
fore we went into the field. Also, we learned about 
the history behind the band and their leigons of 
fans, colloquially known as "Deadheads". We 
were never able to pinpoint exactly what makes a 
person a "deadhead" . That definition may be just 
as amorphous as the bands music itself; easy to 
generalize, but difficult to categorize. 

Once we completed the classroom work, 
we then prepared to hit the road. Boarding our 



rented tour bus. we then embarked on the first of 
our four stadium dates. First we traveled to 
Sullivan Stadium in Foxboro. MA, then over to 
Rich Stadium, outside of Buffalo, N.Y. Our third 
stop was J. F.K. Stadium in Philidelphia. followed 
by the final stop of the first leg of our tour which 
was Giants" Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. All 
of these stadiums had 50.000+ seating capacities. 
We conducted interviews with participants in the 
subculture, wrote observational reports, recorded 
statistical data, and began to consider possible 
topics for our papers. 

We then returned home for a short break 
as the band continued on to R.F.K. Stadium in 
Washington, D.C. We resumed the tour at Deer 
Creek. Indiana. Deer Creek was a brand new 
venue and was considerably smaller with only 
around 14,000+ seats. Then we traveled to the 
highlight of the tour in East Troy, Wisconsin. The 
band performed three nights at the familar Alpine 
Valley Music Center, treating us to a first night 
show consisting of twenty-one songs and per- 
forming "We Bid You Goodnight" for the first 
time since the closing of the Winterland in 1978. 
All said and done, it was a most memorable and 
incredible summer school experience. 

— Austin Dashiell 





193 



The Carolinian 



% 










Every Thursday. 



News 
Features 

194 



Editorials 
Sports 



Now that you have 

the Tim 9\[eedCcs... 

All you need is the 

%aCticCoscope 

The Video Yearbook is the perfect 

complement to the Print Yearbook. 

The Video sets the faces and events you 

see on these pages in motion. 

The 1989-90 school year has been 

captured on tape in living color and set 

to the latest music. 

It's not too late to enhance your 

memories of the years at U9\(CQ. 

To order the Kaleidoscope, call 

(919) 334-5065 or 334-5407 

Supply is limited, order today! 

~195 



We are proud to 
have helped you 
reach the end of 
this journey 




Our best wishes 
for success and 
happiness, in all 
you do !! 

DARE 

TO BE 

GREAT!! 



THE UNCG BOOKSTORE 

All the books you need . . . and a whole lot more. 



196 



coraddi 

UNCG'S Magazine of the Arts 



salute 



tothestaffof1990 



editor wil gehne literary editor davii anireiv 

associate editor ricq pattay typography Stephanie tvright 

art editor chad cameron faculty advisor william tucfor 

photography jim counts visual consultant carl billingsley 



poetry music stories dance words motion 
thought reflection vision perspective brush and tongue 
cast iron sculpture sand wood craft 
charcoal stroke fragile mold light to dark 
color force passion vision mixed canvass complete 



197 



Qim 9{eedtes Staff 



COLOPHON 

The 77th volume of Pine Needles is a publication of UNCG in conjunction with the University 
Media Board, Greensboro, NC. The yearbook was printed by the Delmar Company of Charlotte, NC. 
The publisher representative was Brian Hunter. The Editor-in-Chief of the yearbook was Anne 
Bentzel. The faculty advisor was Dr. James Evans. The yearbook contains 200 pages including 8 
pages of color. The yearbook was submitted camera ready on disks to the publisher. Layouts were 
designed on an Apple Macintosh Plus using Pagemaker 3.0 and Microsoft Word. 

A two-color litho cover using kivar material with film lamination was designed by Matthew 
French. Paper selected was 80 lb. Westvaco Sterling gloss enamel. Graphic design by Nathaniel 
Durham. Estimated cost of producing 800 copies was $16,000. Copies were sold to the students at 
$ 1 7 apiece. Portraits by Carl Wolf Studios. Candid shots were taken on Kodak T-max 400 speed film. 
Ilford HP5 and XP1 film and printed on Ilford multigrade and Kodak poly-contrast papers. 
Photographic supplies by Carl Wolf Studios. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

April Riley 

Roy Lindlau 
Steve Harbour 

Kevin Kasai 
Brian Huskey 

Matt French 
Cathie Somers 
Austin Dashiel 

Ed Smith 
Anne Bentzel 

Kim Smith 
Randall Hinds 
Reid Chapman 
Nancy Bamett 

Hunter Kratt 



WRITERS 

Erin Duggan 
Glen Thomas 
Anne Bentzel 

Tim Carter 

Rod Overton 
Cathie Somers 
Austin Dashiell 

Laura Pope 
Lisa A. Raymer 

Jamie Press 
J.J. McEachern 

Kim Smith 



198 








Staff: Anne Bentzel, Tim Carter, Nathaniel Durham, Austin Dashiell, Kim Smith, Susie Dale, 
Susan Feagin, Rachel Woffard, Ian Cohen, Cathie Somers, Jennifer Jones, and Tiffeny Fields. 



199 



( JAj\OG iS d QTtdt SCllOOl. I doubt that we could have ever been able to capture in 
a few pictures and a smattering of words the essence behind this •University. I Iqiozu that each student has or will 
have his or her own memories of 'U'MfQ. 

IIO^CQ has been so many things for all of us. It has been the threshold upon which the fast of childhood has 
slipped away, and the emergence of a concrete adulthood which has entered. It has meant deep friendships, as well 
as slight, fleeting ones; people who have entered our lives for a semester or a year, and have interested us in a new 
subject, introduced us to our best friends, and then have moved on. It has been books we have read and ideas that 
we have learned that have interested and captivated us, despite ourselves. 

It is impossible to capture these things into pictures and words broad enough to encompass every individual's 
college life. •Each individual's experiences are much richer, much fuller than can be contained within this book,- but 
we have tried. '/ 1 'e have tried to show the diversity within this campus, the diversity which some might calllack_of 
unification, but which in reality translates into stimulation. I hope we have been able to capture some of the beauty 
of this campus; the rose sky, the deep green of the grass and trees, and the soft yellow orange lights which brighten 
the brickjvalkways on a summer night; the orange and yel'Unv reds of 'the trees which line the soccer field in the autumn, 
and the campus cloaked in a white snow during the winter.... all of these are so much a part of our campus life, and 
images we should not forget. 

It has not been easy, attempting to produce this yearbook-. I would like to thank my staff for supporting me 
when 1 tookjhis position in mid semester. It was a great challenge, at times a seemingly insurmountable challenge, 
yet we persevered, and succeeded. There are so many people I have to thank, for supporting, and believing in myself 
and my staff. Primarily I would like to thanfcjane •Davenport. She has been the person that I turned to in the times 
of distress. She has supported, listened, and sympathized better than anyone could, and she has done so, not fust for 
me, but for all the students on the 'Media hall. I don 't think words can even begin to thank her for all of her help, 
friendship and support, but I will attempt here to express my gratitude. 

I -would like to thankjMatthe-w 'Trench for creating countless, upon countless covers and always doing so with 
a smile. I would like to thank'Jypd Overton, for all of his computer expertise, and advice. 'Thanks Austin, for blowing 
off^ewjorkl thanks 'Tim, Christi, 'Kim, 'Barbie, Will, and 'Dr. Wall for your tissues and advice. 'Brian 'Hunter, we 
couldn 't have done it without you. Suzic 'Dale, 'Kachel, and Susan, you guys were great, so were you 'Mate. Ian you 
were an outstanding senior! 

I would like now to thank, my parents, 'you have installed confidence within me, and have given me. all the 
security I need to succeed in life. 'Most importantly I would like to tliank.'U'Mfif for making my college years so 
wonderful. I had ' a great tunc. - Anne 'Bcntzel, 'Editor- In-Chief 




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